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Toronto Cops Use Radar Guns on Cyclists on Bike Path and People Aren’t Having It

In the larger scheme of things, having any police department send out traffic officers to get cyclists to slow down doesn’t feel like a priority. But it is for the 22 Division in Toronto, Ontario, Canada – and they’re now paying the price for it.
Toronto cops stop cyclists for speeding on dedicated bike path, are mocked online 5 photos
Toronto cops stop cyclists for speeding on dedicated bike path, are mocked onlineToronto cops stop cyclists for speeding on dedicated bike path, are mocked onlineToronto cops stop cyclists for speeding on dedicated bike path, are mocked onlineToronto cops stop cyclists for speeding on dedicated bike path, are mocked online
Generally speaking, there is no legal speed limit for cycling, but local authorities may impose some in areas where it’s deemed necessary. This seems to have been the case here, where a bike path in south Etobicoke in Toronto was riddled with signs warning cyclists not to go above 20 kph (12.4 mph).

Several officers were dispatched with speed guns, pointing them at cyclists to determine whether they were traveling faster than the limit. A photographer was also on hand and the resulting photos were posted to social media.

The accompanying post doesn’t mention the words ticket or fine, and it doesn’t look like this was more than a local campaign meant to raise awareness on the need for cyclists to slow down – on that particular bike path, at least. But it didn’t go down well with countless Toronto residents, who took to social media to rip into the PD for wasting time and resources to tackle a problem that isn’t even a problem in the first place, BlogTo informs.

When you have speeding, impaired driving, reckless driving and dangerous traffic behaviors, yelling at cyclists to slow down shouldn’t be high on the to-do list, commenters are saying, criticizing the police for making a mockery out of enforcement. In its defense, the PD says this was a problem because “concerns” had been expressed, but that ultimately, the goal was to “educate” cyclists.

“The speed radars were used purely for education & not enforcement. We received a positive response from residents,” the department says on Twitter.

Not so much from everyone else commenting on the topic on social media.





 
 
 
 
 

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