autoevolution
Car video reviews:
 
Tomorrow's Zero Gravity Honeymoons Trump Any Billionaire Weddings of Today
Most people see their honeymoon as the one occasion where you’re meant to feel like a king and queen. For the next few minutes, forget the Caribbean and say hello to... Earth’s orbit?

Tomorrow's Zero Gravity Honeymoons Trump Any Billionaire Weddings of Today

Horny Moon AirwaysHorny Moon AirwaysHorny Moon AirwaysHorny Moon AirwaysHorny Moon AirwaysHorny Moon AirwaysHorny Moon AirwaysHorny Moon AirwaysHorny Moon AirwaysHorny Moon AirwaysHorny Moon AirwaysHorny Moon AirwaysHorny Moon AirwaysHorny Moon AirwaysHorny Moon AirwaysHorny Moon AirwaysHorny Moon AirwaysHorny Moon AirwaysHorny Moon AirwaysHorny Moon AirwaysHorny Moon AirwaysHorny Moon Airways
Ladies and gents, and future newlyweds, welcome to a new era in marital enjoyment. Dubbed Horny Moon Airways, this conceptual space installation is exploring the possibility of a honeymoon in space. The one responsible is none other than aircraft and interior designer, Yelken Octuri.

Now, that sounds all wonderful and stuff, but the reality is a bit different than what you might expect. To get a clear understanding of what it is you see before you, I must give you a few clues as to how this system would work.

The inspiration for the project began years ago, but a quick study of airline regulations made Octuri realize that the project couldn’t unfurl as he would have wished. Sometime later, the designer was contacted by Maxime Vaeli, responsible for the Vestal brand, which now includes a record label and retail networks. Because Maxime wanted to explore space tourism, the project was once again underway.

Octuri’s concept explores a 48-hour honeymoon in space, but to get there, the system relies on a plane to take newlyweds to an altitude of 200 kilometers (124 miles). Once the target elevation is achieved, the plane/shuttle releases the capsules into Earth’s orbit and the next 48 hours remain in the hands of each couple.

The shuttle can accommodate five capsules, in total, only ten lucky newlyweds. Six thrusters at the rear are used for propulsion, while a very elongated cargo bay will house the capsules while traveling to the required destination. Once at altitude, the capsules release and the countdown begins.

Each capsule is dome-shaped in order to offer as much of a field of view as possible, because God-willing, you’ll be blessed with only one honeymoon for the rest of your life (divorce rates are up).

Once capsules are released into orbit, the roof of each one opens to reveal nine petal-like panels, covered in photovoltaic cells. My guess is that this is where the capsule’s main source of power will be coming from, but the designer doesn’t mention this feature in detail.

Each capsule includes a padded floor which also houses a bed and a couple of retractable love seats. Also in the mix, two hatches, one of which allows guests access to the toilet, while the other is for entry into the capsule.

Now, the designer makes a specific mention that frolicking in space is no easy task and even informs would-be guests that they should be highly attentive when embarking upon zero-gravity intercourse. To help minimize the risk of injury in case things get out of control, several solutions are presented.

The first is that of lining the capsule with a high wall which is then covered with more padding, or, the idea of a strap system that allows guests to hold on while exploring newfound ways to practice an otherwise simple and innate activity.

Once the 48 hours have elapsed, each capsule is to return to Earth without the initial shuttle. To do this, the designer explored a system like those used by NASA during moon missions, via splashdown. Twelve thrusters are spread throughout the edges of the capsule in order to adjust course, a heat shield to protect against the roaring flames of re-entry, and seven parachutes to slow everything down for a smooth landing.

Just wait for your superyacht to come pick you up, because if you have the cash for a honeymoon in space, you probably own a yacht too, and then off you go, back to the classic bedframe.

Sure, it may sound like a stretch on the reality of things, but space tourism is an upcoming idea, so you can probably expect something like this in the future. 

 
 
 
 
 

Would you like AUTOEVOLUTION to send you notifications?

You will only receive our top stories