autoevolution
Car video reviews:
 

Tired of Westfalia Builds? Check This Volkswagen EuroVan Winnebago Camper Instead

The fourth-generation Volkswagen Transporter was sold in the U.S. as the EuroVan. It has made a name for itself within the camper community. This 1999 Volkswagen EuroVan Winnebago Camper is a classic in this regard.
1999 Volkswagen EuroVan Winnebago Camper on Bring a Trailer 21 photos
1999 Volkswagen EuroVan Winnebago Camper on Bring a Trailer1999 Volkswagen EuroVan Winnebago Camper on Bring a Trailer1999 Volkswagen EuroVan Winnebago Camper on Bring a Trailer1999 Volkswagen EuroVan Winnebago Camper on Bring a Trailer1999 Volkswagen EuroVan Winnebago Camper on Bring a Trailer1999 Volkswagen EuroVan Winnebago Camper on Bring a Trailer1999 Volkswagen EuroVan Winnebago Camper on Bring a Trailer1999 Volkswagen EuroVan Winnebago Camper on Bring a Trailer1999 Volkswagen EuroVan Winnebago Camper on Bring a Trailer1999 Volkswagen EuroVan Winnebago Camper on Bring a Trailer1999 Volkswagen EuroVan Winnebago Camper on Bring a Trailer1999 Volkswagen EuroVan Winnebago Camper on Bring a Trailer1999 Volkswagen EuroVan Winnebago Camper on Bring a Trailer1999 Volkswagen EuroVan Winnebago Camper on Bring a Trailer1999 Volkswagen EuroVan Winnebago Camper on Bring a Trailer1999 Volkswagen EuroVan Winnebago Camper on Bring a Trailer1999 Volkswagen EuroVan Winnebago Camper on Bring a Trailer1999 Volkswagen EuroVan Winnebago Camper on Bring a Trailer1999 Volkswagen EuroVan Winnebago Camper on Bring a Trailer1999 Volkswagen EuroVan Winnebago Camper on Bring a Trailer
Although you can see many Westfalia builds floating around, Winnebago was the company that made the official conversions for the U.S. market. The T4 was the first Transporter with a water-cooled front engine, but it wasn’t very successful in the U.S. Volkswagen even discontinued the EuroVan after only one year on the market in 1994. The main reason for the disappointing sales was the weak engines, so the Germans tried again in 1999 with the VR6 engine as standard.

This EuroVan was one of the first to arrive on American soil in 1999. Like other Winnebago campers, it’s the long-wheelbase version of the van, which offers plenty of space inside. What’s special about it is that it’s one-family owned and it was very well taken care of. It only has 100,000 miles (161,000 km), another advantage of this beautiful camper.

The van is finished in white and features a pop-top roof tent and a retractable awning. External utility ports adorn the street side of the bus, allowing occupants to take advantage of campsites. The cabin features captain’s chairs and a rear bench seat upholstered in patterned gray cloth and vinyl. There’s also an adjustable table and the usual camper paraphernalia.

The camper can seat six and sleep four in the fold-out bed in the back and the bunk bed under the roof. The refrigerator can use propane, DC, or AC power, and there’s also a furnace to help keep the cabin warm. The kitchen also has a two-burner propane stove, a cold water sink, and a grey water tank.

The EuroVan is listed on Bring a Trailer, and the seller mentions it was adequately serviced in preparation for sale. The work included replacing the ball joints, tie rods, axles, brakes, shocks, fuel injectors, and intake manifold gasket. This means that whoever buys it would not need to worry about maintenance anytime soon.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

Would you like AUTOEVOLUTION to send you notifications?

You will only receive our top stories