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Times Are Tough, Buy Yourself a 1943 Chrysler M4A4 Sherman Tank
Someone thought that now would be a good time to sell a tank. We can’t disagree with this logic. Market conditions look right for something like this to fetch the big bucks. But even if you don’t want to buy a tank, taking a look at this Chrysler-made Army vehicle is a must. It comes with a lot of history.

Times Are Tough, Buy Yourself a 1943 Chrysler M4A4 Sherman Tank

1943 Chrysler M4A4 Sherman Tank1943 Chrysler M4A4 Sherman Tank1943 Chrysler M4A4 Sherman Tank1943 Chrysler M4A4 Sherman Tank1943 Chrysler M4A4 Sherman Tank1943 Chrysler M4A4 Sherman Tank
Imagine what life looked like back in the 1940s. Everyone minded their business in the U.S., while Europe was engulfed in another armed fight. The Germans were really keen on expanding their borders by force, even though nobody really welcomed them and their ideology.

Some belligerent nations asked the U.S. for help, but America wasn’t ready to sacrifice its soldiers for the mess Europeans did. They kept enabling the crazy Austria-born man that, in the end, led Germany into a second defeat that was going to split the country in two – a reality that can be seen and felt even today. Hitler’s vanity and desire for useless greatness was a major mistake that stopped European development for at least another decade. Millions died. Cities were ruined. Lives were destroyed.

In what can be safely called a very unlikely scenario, Europeans will have to be eternally grateful to the Japanese. Their zero-logic strategy to attack Pearl Harbor was what got the U.S. involved for real in the Second World War (WW2). Even though Americans were providing weapons to countries like Great Britain, Portugal, and even France through Spain, they initially didn't want to sacrifice soldiers in another part of the world.The balance of power shifted rapidly
Furthermore, the U.S. was doing pretty well, thanks to its partners. Democratic nations asked for help, and America delivered, but not for free. Help came at a cost. That’s why companies like Chrysler or Ford did very well.

For example, the British were using Chrysler M3 Grant tanks to fight the Italians and the Germans. Unfortunately for the model we have seen for sale on BaT, the M4A4 Sherman wasn’t picked by the U.S. for the military to use overseas like its M3 Grant counterpart. Even though it provided better suspension, a simpler, tougher hull, and improved soft ground traction, it didn’t make the cut. Still, there were 7,499 made in total. The U.S. military, however, used it mainly for training, while the British called it the Sherman V and put it to some work.

Now some models are being made available to civilians that want to have fun experiencing the life of a soldier in WW2. However, you have to adhere to a special set of rules as a tank owner. These vehicles aren't street-legal, but local authorities allow their presence on the public roads for refueling or parades.

This 1943 Chrysler M4A4 Sherman Tank, according to the owner, has been recovered from the British. It has seen the UK, Ireland, France, and is now in the U.S. The military vehicle was donated to the Museum of the American G.I. of College Station, Texas, in 2019.An unlikely combination
It uses an 18-liter Ford V8 that’s connected to a five-speed manual gearbox. The engine was sourced from the M4A3 predecessor. The tank has been restored to look like it’s returned unscathed from the battleground with all the correct markings. The current owner also paid for rebuilding the air cleaners and serviced the electrical and cooling systems.

Furthermore, this one comes with armor plating, pioneer tools, the main gun that’s been demilitarized, and a replica roof-mounted machine gun. The turret works! It was verified before the tank went online.

The Chrysler tank also has the correct serial numbers that match Chrysler’s database.

Bidders joked about this tank being “the perfect cure for modern-day rush hour traffic,” while potential buyers already started the offers going. It currently sits at a price of $2,000. The owner chose to have a reserve set, so don’t expect it to get away for cheap.

Before you decide to join in on the fun, just remember there’s no need to get registration or a title for tanks. Now watch the video down below and make up your own mind about it.

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Editor's note: This article has not been sponsored or supported by a third party.

 
 
 
 
 

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