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Tilting Motor Works Shows the Fun Side of Trikes

One of the major drawbacks of traditional trikes is the poor way they ride around the corners. That is, if you want to make it back home in one piece, riding a trike around tight bends at high speed is one of the things written in bold letters on your no-no list.
Tilting Motor Works trike 1 photo
Because they don't lean, common trikes and Can-Ams make poor machines for taking fast turns. The Spyders come with all sorts of electronic aids to compensate for this, and they rely on their stability control algorithms to keep man and machine on the road.

If you watch their promo videos, they graciously avoid the subject, and you won't see official footage of a Spyder being manhandled around a corner. Sure, there are some bold guys that can manage these machines and are not afraid to skid the rear wheel a bit, but they are hardly the main target for the Can-Am marketers.

Leaning introduces the fun factor


The same goes for usual trikes, and for both categories, one more thing must be mentioned. It's their immobile center of gravity that makes things worse when turning, pushing the bikes off the ideal line and generating their tendency to flip.

Tilting Motor Works (TMW) solves the problem by converting bikes into trikes using a tilting assembly. Sure thing, TMW's machines don't look as flamboyant as the classic trikes, but they are undoubtedly way more fun.

The two wheels at the front are mounted on a tilting linkage that allows the bike to lean as if it were a casual two-wheeler. This allows the rider to use his or her body weight to steer, leaning into the turn and shifting the center of gravity. All this, while retaining the superior stability the three wheels offer.

Behind the bars of a Tilting Motor Works trike, you'll find it infinitely easier to keep up with the two-wheeled chaps in your group and also look better and stay safe while at it.



 
 
 
 
 

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