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This Trench Transforms Into a One-Man Tent, Is Perfect for Emergency Situations
The market is rich in options as far as camping, vanlife, or overlanding are concerned. According to budget, willingness to rough it, time availability, and individual inclinations, you can pick and choose from the thousands of tents, pop-up roof tents, RVs, overlanders, motorhomes, tiny homes, the like.

This Trench Transforms Into a One-Man Tent, Is Perfect for Emergency Situations

Survivalist: Adapting to Change collection offers transformable outerwear for emergency situationsSurvivalist: Adapting to Change collection offers transformable outerwear for emergency situationsSurvivalist: Adapting to Change collection offers transformable outerwear for emergency situationsSurvivalist: Adapting to Change collection offers transformable outerwear for emergency situationsSurvivalist: Adapting to Change collection offers transformable outerwear for emergency situationsSurvivalist: Adapting to Change collection offers transformable outerwear for emergency situationsSurvivalist: Adapting to Change collection offers transformable outerwear for emergency situations
Even having the choice is a luxury we might not be aware of. For people in emergency situations, finding shelter is, in itself, both incredibly challenging and potentially life-saving. Here is where the Survivalist collection of outerwear comes in.

Yes, the “outerwear” term is not a typo. This is definitely a departure from the kind of products we cover, but it deserves a mention. For one, it would be amazing if it ever made it into production because of those life-saving abilities. Secondly, it provides mobility and, thirdly, it could work for camping as well.

The Survivalist collection exists, but it’s not mass-produced. It is the brainchild of designer Emi Tanimura, as her graduate thesis from the London College of Fashion, the Fashion Design and Development course. The thesis is called “Survivalist: Adapting to Change” and was inspired by Tanimura’s own experience with rough-sleeping during a time when she was estranged from her parents.

The collection includes just two transformable items and another one that is very practical but not transformable. All three can work in a variety of scenarios: rough-sleeping/homelessness, emergency situations, camping, and other leisure activities in the great outdoors.

The highlight is the Tent Trench, a trench that transforms into a one-person tent or temporary shelter. Because it contains inflatable poles, it would be easy to transport around without dealing with the extra weight. In fact, you would be wearing it: as the video at the bottom of the page shows, the tent is made from material that detaches from below the waist. You wouldn’t be left without a jacket just to get the tent, which is another plus.

The Tent Trench would be made with deadstock fabrics, meaning unsold inventory that can be upcycled and, most importantly, acquired in bulk on the cheap. It would also include technical materials, like Gore-Tex, to be anti-tear, wind- and waterproof, UV resistant, and breathable.

The second item is the Bomber Bag, a bomber jacket that becomes a backpack. Tanimura got the idea from her own experience of carrying a jacket that she was no longer wearing because the weather had turned warmer. With this item, you turn the jacket inside out, and it becomes a spacious, smartly organized backpack that holds all your stuff. It has seven compartments and a bungee cord for additional items and is made of Supplex, another material that is waterproof, wind and UV resistant, breathable, and durable.

The third item is a pair of pants. It doesn’t transform, but it’s made to last in similar types of scenarios, since it's made from deadstock fabric with a waterproof finish. The designer says she planned to include more items in the Survivalist collection but was eventually unable to due to the international health crisis.

“The designs aim to provide wearers versatility, comfort, and relief in challenging, changing environments,” Tanimura says.

On a minor note of superficiality, they also look good—certainly better than some of the stuff you see coming off the catwalk. More importantly, though, they would offer protection and convenience, limited as they are, at a theoretical low price point to people forced, one way or another, to face the elements 24/7.



 
 
 
 
 

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