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This Roborace Polestar 1K Concept Is a Raging Autonomous Machine
We feel it's safe to assume that you’ve already heard of Roborace and how it’s bringing autonomous supercars to the racetrack. In case you haven't heard of it, what the boys are doing is pushing autonomous technology and systems to their limits. But that’s only part of the deal. They’re also researching electric drive tech as well.

This Roborace Polestar 1K Concept Is a Raging Autonomous Machine

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Now that we’re all caught up, what you are looking at is simply a concept design for the sole purpose of being included in Roborace. Created by Fabian Brees for #InktoberPolestarChallenge, this vehicle design could very well be a contender in the races.

When we first ran across her mean front end, we were reminded of the old Speedracer car. It’s that front splitter and split rear that might give it that look. But if you don’t know what we’re talking about, not a problem. You’ll get an idea soon enough.

She is known as the Polestar 1K and does include all the conceptual tech to operate in Roborace. But before we get into the inner workings, let's have a look outside. As mentioned earlier, the 1K includes a massive carbon fiber front splitter meant to help it stick to the road and also direct air to cool components where needed.

Much like the Nvidia Formula E, a low body and high-rise wheel wells are the main look for the car. This is due to the elimination of a driver and replacing that driver with diverse hardware to work together with the vehicles internal AI. This AI sits at the front of the vehicle where we would normally find an engine.

Like any self-respecting autonomous vehicle, a number of cameras and sensors are deployed to make sure that she can smoothly cruise at 175 mph (282 kph). What? You didn’t know that this was the average speed recorded at Roborace? Yeah. All autonomous too.

The first set of cameras sit right above the headlights. These are meant to cover all road information received from the front of the car and pass it on to the AI in order to anticipate and prepare for upcoming road conditions. These cameras are somewhat set towards the sides of the 1K as to also cover these angles.

What you may find different than the Nvidia is the visible power connections on top. Remember, it is meant to be electric as well. This visibility should allow the racing team to quickly assess any sort of battery damage during a race. And if needed, even allow quick access to replace faulty components. Right behind that we can also find a charger hatch.

From here the body splits into two separate bodies that house each rear wheel. The rear-center of the vehicle is simply missing. This offers very good aerodynamics and allow the rear wing to be utilized to its full potential. On the outer corners of the body we find two more cameras for rear view and more of the sides.

But it’s atop the vehicle that we find the most important piece. That orange fin that runs down the middle of the rear holds a 360-degree angle camera. It’s this little bad boy that makes sure everything else is going smoothly with all other road conditions.

For cooling, the front has an intake that cools the AI and battery components. At the rear, this intake has an outlet that lets all hot air escape and makes sure everything runs at optimal performance.

Even though it is a conceptual design, it’s vehicles like these that offer us a possible look at the future of things to come.

 
 
 
 
 

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