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This Rare 1972 Dodge Charger Spent Decades in a Junkyard, Still Has Original 440 Block

Hit by the oil crisis and new government regulations that mandated lower emissions, U.S. muscle cars began to lose power (and popularity) in 1972. Some nameplates disappeared altogether by 1974, while others soldiered on in milder formats. For the iconic Dodge Charger, 1972 brought important changes that prepped the muscle car for the Malaise era.
1972 Dodge Charger Rallye junkyard find 6 photos
1972 Dodge Charger Rallye junkyard find1972 Dodge Charger Rallye junkyard find1972 Dodge Charger Rallye junkyard find1972 Dodge Charger Rallye junkyard find1972 Dodge Charger Rallye junkyard find
The disappearance of the 426-cubic-inch (7.0-liter) Hemi V8 was the number one change on the list. Mopar retired the iconic mill altogether, so the 440-cubic-inch (7.2-liter) RB V8 took over as the range-topping unit. Horsepower went down across the board, but that was mainly due to the Chrysler Corporation dropping gross figures for net ratings.

Rated at 350 gross horsepower in 1971, the 440 V8 was advertised with 280 net horsepower for the 1972 model year. Dodge also dropped the R/T designation but replaced it with the Rallye, previously available as a package. The Charger also lost all hi-impact color choices save for Hemi Orange and Top Banana.

1972 was also the final year for the Dana 60 differential. It was offered only in combination with the 440 RB V8 and the four-speed manual transmission. This brings me to this Dodge Charger Rallye that was recently saved from the junkyard. Originally built with the 440/Dana/four-speed combo, it's one of the rarest Chargers from the 1972 model year: one of only 165 built.

Delivered in B5 Blue, it's now covered in rust patches and the engine bay is empty, but it does come with its numbers-matching 440 engine block. It no longer has the original gearbox, but the replacement is also a four-speed manual, apparently sourced from a Hemi model from the same generation.

While it may appear to be in really bad shape and incomplete, most of the missing parts are scatted inside the cabin and the trunk. And don't mind the hidden headlamps, which were available only on the SE version only, this Charger comes with the correct and original grille in the rear seat.

Somewhat surprising for a car that spent years and years in a junkyard, this Charger still has many of its identification plates. It also comes with plenty of documentation and the original build sheet. And yes, the muscle car is looking for a new owner that will give it a second chance at life. You can find out more about that in the video below.

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Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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