autoevolution
Car video reviews:
 
This Pile of Rust Is the Cheapest Used Car for Sale on eBay, Should It Be Rescued?
Ever dreamed about owning a classic car? Probably yes at one point, yet after becoming aware of the issues that come with these rides, not to mention that they’re not the best to drive, most of us have erased that thought from our minds. Not entirely, however, because there’s always the possibility of having a long-lost rich uncle out there, right?

This Pile of Rust Is the Cheapest Used Car for Sale on eBay, Should It Be Rescued?

1941 Cadillac Fleetwood1941 Cadillac Fleetwood1941 Cadillac Fleetwood1941 Cadillac Fleetwood1941 Cadillac Fleetwood1941 Cadillac Fleetwood1941 Cadillac Fleetwood1941 Cadillac Fleetwood1941 Cadillac Fleetwood1941 Cadillac Fleetwood1941 Cadillac Fleetwood1941 Cadillac Fleetwood1941 Cadillac Fleetwood1941 Cadillac Fleetwood1941 Cadillac Fleetwood1941 Cadillac Fleetwood1941 Cadillac Fleetwood1941 Cadillac Fleetwood1941 Cadillac Fleetwood1941 Cadillac Fleetwood1941 Cadillac Fleetwood1941 Cadillac Fleetwood
Old timers with ABS, power steering, air conditioning, heated seats, modern audio, and a relatively new engine under the hood that features no carburetors are the ones to go for, as far as this writer is concerned anyway. Sure, they cost a lot of money, but if you can afford one, then you should go for it, because you’d still get those timeless looks, wrapped in a more appealing package.

If you truly know your way around cars, are not afraid of elbow grease, have a decent garage with many tools, a lot of free time, and the funds to back it up, then you could turn a classic model into a restomod. Buying the perfect project car is almost half the work, and if it comes with a few original parts, in decent condition, that’s even better.

The one pictured in the gallery above, however, ticks neither box, as it is essentially a pile of rust, and at the time of writing, it was the cheapest used car for sale on eBay. That’s right, we resumed the series started last fall with the fourth take on the topic, which puts the spotlight on this Cadillac Fleetwood, or what used to be one anyway.

Made in 1941, it is a $1,000 affair, and it is worth noting that the vendor accepts four equal monthly payments for it too. But we would be in no rush to make it ours, as it does look like a headache, and many sleepless nights.

For one, someone truly interested in it should know how to deal with rust. Secondly, they would also have to source some panels, such as the hood, which appears to be missing completely, and trunk lid, as it doesn’t look rescuable. The front and rear windscreens, a couple of side windows, at least one headlight, and two taillights, are required as well. Add pretty much all mechanical components, and a thorough inspection of the original V8 engine and gearbox, a complete interior, manhours, and do the math.

A nice Cadillac Fleetwood from 1941 usually sells for around $30,000. We found some head-turning ones for $40,000 listed for grabs, so it’s not that valuable. On top of that, it’s not exactly the automotive equivalent of a unicorn either, and we wonder if it is actually worth saving.

We’re inclined to say ‘no,’ though if you’re not so sure about that, then we’d advise you to take a trip to Gray Court, South Carolina, and take a better look at it, preferably accompanied by someone skilled enough to advise you on certain aspects.

Now, if you came here hoping perhaps to land a vehicle for cheap to get you to and fro, then you should know that $1,000 won’t cut it, and you will have to at least double that sum. For around $2,500, you could get a 17-year old Dodge Grand Caravan that still looks like it has some life left in it, or an Audi A4 with a 3.0-liter engine, which will turn 20 next year. These definitely beat walking, and they were some of the most affordable drivable cars at the time of writing. Nonetheless, we wouldn’t bet our bottom dollar on the 'drivable’ part just by looking at some pictures, and taking the vendor’s word for granted.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

Would you like AUTOEVOLUTION to send you notifications?

You will only receive our top stories