autoevolution
Car video reviews:
 

This One-Owner 1966 Ford Mustang Looks Better Than 99 Percent of Barn Finds

First-generation Mustangs are highly desirable models, not only for those who are looking for a cheap daily driver but also in the restoration business.
1966 Ford Mustang 13 photos
1966 Ford Mustang1966 Ford Mustang1966 Ford Mustang1966 Ford Mustang1966 Ford Mustang1966 Ford Mustang1966 Ford Mustang1966 Ford Mustang1966 Ford Mustang1966 Ford Mustang1966 Ford Mustang1966 Ford Mustang
And this makes perfect sense. A fully restored Mustang could end up being worth a small fortune if done right, especially if most of its originality is preserved.

This one-owner Ford Mustang that someone has recently discovered in a barn could be one of them. While no information has been offered on how much of it is still original, there’s no doubt the pony looks better than many of the barn finds we’ve seen lately.

It indeed requires some occasional work, but the seller says on Craigslist that you wouldn’t find any rust on it. This can mean one of two things: the Mustang has either received some metal work before ending up in the barn, or it has been stored just in the right conditions.

The more or less disappointing news comes from what you’ll find when looking under the hood.

This Mustang is powered by a six-cylinder engine, and of course, it’s not exactly the V8 muscle many people are looking for.

In 1966, Ford offered pretty much the same engine options as in 1965, starting with the 200 (3.3-liter) six-cylinder developing 120 horsepower. Several V8s were also available, all of them variations of the 289 (4.7-liter). The top configuration was the HiPo unit with a 4-barrel carburetor rated at 270 horsepower.

Based on its looks, this Mustang still runs and drives, but this is something that any potential buyer would have to double-check before committing to a purchase.

As for the price, the Mustang can be yours for $10,500. It’s parked in Edmonds, so if you want to make sure this is the right project, just head over to its current home and inspect it thoroughly.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third party.

 
 
 
 
 

Would you like AUTOEVOLUTION to send you notifications?

You will only receive our top stories