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This F-16 Fighting Falcons Photo Is a Trick, But a Real Thunderbirds One

If it were possible for fighter airplanes to launch themselves at the Moon, this is how that would probably look: the sleek silhouette of F-16s, wearing the colors of the American flag, shooting up in a way not many such machines are capable of doing, and possibly even making the mighty Space Launch System feel threatened a bit.
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At the time of writing, the U.S. Air Force (USAF) Thunderbirds team is busy getting its act together before the official 2022 air show season kicks off for them in March. In early January, the crew traveled to Spaceport America in New Mexico, where it started the mandatory training sessions.

It is from there that this image comes from, showing four of the F-16 Fighting Falcons flown by the Thunderbirds soaring vertically into the sky as part of one of the routines we’ll get to see this year.

At the time of writing, we are not aware of any new maneuver being prepared for the new season. Back in 2021, the unit came up with an incredible stunt that involved not only its six planes, but also the six F/A-18 Super Hornets flown by the U.S. Navy's Blue Angels.

In 2022, the team will be present at over 30 events across America. It all kicks off during the Luke Days Air and Space Expo at the Luke Air Force Base in Arizona in March and will conclude in November at the Nellis Air Force Base in Nevada.

Until they get to amaze us all with their skills, the pilots of the Thunderbirds team will continue training, and it’s likely the Air Force will continue to advertise their efforts. So keep an eye out for more exciting, professional photos of the team in action, before the Internet gets flooded with amateur stills and videos.

 
 
 
 
 

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