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This Corn Cob Mini Plymouth Duster Project Car Lived a Short Life, Tuning Mishaps to Blame

Earlier in the week, American Race driver, YouTuber, and car enthusiast Garrett Mitchel, popularly known as Cleetus McFarland, showcased a significantly shortened 70s-era Plymouth Duster project build, a.k.a Corn Cob. Forget how cute it looks; McFarland is turning it into a beast for some burnout and donut action.
Corn Cob Mini Plymouth Duster Project Car 9 photos
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On the last upload, the YouTuber told his fans he was looking to do some modifications to the corn cob Plymouth Duster to boost its power. That involved getting a ‘Summit Racing Care Package’ that included cams, lifters, a performance timing kit, head gaskets, and new head studs.

He also planned on installing new aluminum heads to replace the stock iron version. These mods were purely for heat dissipation for a cooler-running engine. Burnouts and donuts tend to turn up the heat quickly.

Additionally, aluminum heads offer high compression, which equals more power.

There were a few concerns during the first test. For starters, it didn’t have a roll cage. This vehicle isn’t your regular mopar. It’s significantly shorter, meaning a shorter wheelbase, and there’s a high chance it could tip over doing donuts.

It also had low fuel pressure, and the balance was slightly iffy.

On his latest upload, he'd made some progress and was planning on dyno-ing the mopar. To boost the fuel pressure, his team added a Holley Blue electric pump to keep a constant fuel pressure supply. They also replaced a rusted freeze plug that was causing a coolant leak.

Alright guys, corn cob test number two. And we have now an electric fuel pump, we’ve got a full tank of gas, so we are going to see if it shuts down when it whips,” McFarland said.

After the tests, the Duster was clearly running a little better. The next step was to put it on the dyno. The last dyno test (without Summit Racing Kit) with nitrous pulled 201 hp / 204 ps (144 hp / 146 ps without nitrous).

The Dyno didn’t yield good results. The RPMs were pretty low, and after two pulls, the engine didn’t turn on again – it died.

We are a little bummed. We thought we had a good project going here, and two Dyno pulls, and then it was done for,” McFarland revealed.

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