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This 2,700-Mile 1981 Honda CB750K Has New Tires and Oodles of Classic Grandeur

The antique samurai pictured below may not be entirely unscathed, but it’s pretty damn close.
1981 Honda CB750K 35 photos
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Honda’s sublime 1981 MY CB750K is brought to life thanks to an air-cooled 749cc four-banger, with dual overhead camshafts, four valves per cylinder, and a quartet of 30 mm (1.2 inches) Keihin carburetors. The inline-four powerplant – which boasts a compression ratio of 9.0:1 – is connected to the bike’s chain-driven rear wheel via a five-speed transmission.

At approximately 9,000 revs, the engine is capable of spawning up to 72 wild ponies, while a maximum torque output of 48 pound-feet (65 Nm) will be accomplished lower down the rpm range. When it reaches the ground, this force translates to a respectable top speed of 124 mph (200 kph).

Weighing in at 564 pounds (256 kg) on a full stomach, the Japanese head-turner prides itself with a sizeable fuel capacity of 5.3 gallons (20 liters). Braking duties are taken good care of by a single 275 mm (10.8 inches) disc and a traditional drum module that measures 180 mm (7.1 inches) in diameter.

In terms of suspension, you’ll find a set of air-adjustable telescopic forks at the front and dual shock absorbers on the opposite end. Now that we’ve covered the essentials, we’ll have you know the pristine CB750K shown above is heading to auction at this very moment!

Prior to having it listed on Bring A Trailer, the seller went about flushing the creature’s front brake fluid while its ancient tires were deleted to make way for high-grade Kenda Kruz rubber. As far as mileage is concerned, this machine’s five-digit odometer indicates that it’s been ridden for just under 2,700 miles (4,300 km).

If this whole shebang manages to tickle your fancy, make sure you place your bids on the BaT website by Thursday afternoon (January 13), as that’s when the online auction will come to an end. The current bid is registered at a moderate $3,000, but we bet it won’t be staying that way for very long.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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