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This 1981 Honda CBX Pairs Six Cylinders of Brute Force With Aftermarket MAC Exhaust

The CBX can still go like the wind despite its hefty weight, and it’ll also sound pretty damn rad while doing it.
1981 Honda CBX 21 photos
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Honda’s CBX1000 is one of those motorcycles that never got to enjoy the level of attention they deserved while still in production. I mean, sure, combining nearly 100 ponies of raw six-cylinder power with anorexic forks and thin hoops isn’t exactly ideal, but let’s not forget that big engines squeezed into rudimentary chassis were pretty much the norm back in the day.

As such, this machine was more or less on par with its competitors in terms of performance, but the added complexity of two extra cylinders did make it a lot pricier and, therefore, less attractive to buyers. Despite the nameplate’s misfortune and untimely departure, a well-preserved CBX is nowadays quite likely to sell for a pretty penny at auction.

With that being said, we have the pleasure of introducing you to a 1981 model whose OEM exhaust was discarded in favor of six-into-two aftermarket pipework from MAC. In addition, this pristine sport-tourer comes with fresh synthetic upholstery on its two-up saddle, as well as a new front brake master cylinder and moderately-worn Dunlop D404 tires with 2014 date codes.

The CBX1000 Super Sport draws power from an air-cooled 1,047cc inline-six engine with 98 hp and 62 pound-feet of torque (84 Nm) at its disposal. A five-speed gearbox is what links the four-stroke DOHC titan to its bearer’s rear chain-driven wheel, and pushing these components to their limit will ultimately result in a top speed of 135 mph (217 kph).

In order to reach 60 mph (96 kph) from a standstill, the classic six-cylinder brute will require a mere 4.6 ticks of the stopwatch. As you’re reading this, Honda’s gemstone is looking for a new and loving home on Bring a Trailer, where it will remain listed at no reserve for three more days. If spending north of $4,500 to make it your own sounds like an intriguing prospect, then feel free to submit your bids by Sunday, May 1.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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