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This 1979 BMW R100RS Saw Its Fair Share of Miles, But It’s Still Begging for More

The RS had earned itself a legendary reputation in the touring segment over the years, as did its RT cousin.
1979 BMW R100RS 21 photos
1979 BMW R100RS1979 BMW R100RS1979 BMW R100RS1979 BMW R100RS1979 BMW R100RS1979 BMW R100RS1979 BMW R100RS1979 BMW R100RS1979 BMW R100RS1979 BMW R100RS1979 BMW R100RS1979 BMW R100RS1979 BMW R100RS1979 BMW R100RS1979 BMW R100RS1979 BMW R100RS1979 BMW R100RS1979 BMW R100RS1979 BMW R100RS1979 BMW R100RS
Back in the day, the BMW R100RS was one of the loftiest touring machines that money could buy, putting great emphasis on comfort and reliability alike. The 1979 model we’ll be looking at today is still in pretty good shape after a lengthy 41k-mile (66,000-km) lifespan, and it carries an array of aftermarket parts installed by the current long-term owner.

These items include a 16-inch Parabellum windshield, Rox Speed FX handlebar risers and a curvy two-up saddle from Corbin’s inventory. Featuring a wind tunnel-tested fairing penned by Hans Muth, Motorrad’s phenom is put in motion thanks to an air-cooled boxer-twin powerhouse with two valves per cylinder, dual Bing carburetors and a displacement of 980cc.

Resting in a double cradle skeleton made of steel, the engine is good for up to 70 hp when its crank whirls at 7,250 rpm. Moving lower down the rev range, we find the mill’s torque output digits peaking at 56 pound-feet (76 Nm) in the region of 5,500 spins per minute. To reach the rear shaft-driven wheel, this force is routed via a five-speed transmission and a dry single-plate clutch.

Ultimately, the whole operation can lead to a respectable top speed of 120 mph (193 kph). Bavaria’s titan tips the scales at 507 pounds (230 kg) with a full tank of gas, and it sits on leading-axle telescopic forks up front and twin preload-adjustable shock absorbers down south. For braking duties, the Beemer uses a trio of drilled rotors measuring 260 mm (10.2 inches) in diameter.

If you’re after an affordable tourer that can eat miles like there’s no tomorrow, then you may want to consider offering this ‘79 MY R100RS a new place to call home. The German highway crawler is being auctioned off at no reserve on Bring a Trailer, and a pair of Krauser panniers with BMW roundels are included in the sale. With two days to go before the bidding deadline (June 25), you’d only need 2,000 bucks to take this creature home.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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