autoevolution
Car video reviews:
 

This 1972 Ford F-100 Ranger XLT Is Shaming Sports and Muscle Cars on the Track

1972 was the final year for the fifth generation of the F-Series line of pickup trucks, and the F-100 Ranger XLT stands out as one of the most popular. More or less the top trim, this workhorse could also be configured with potent V8s like the 390 FE that cranked out as many as 255 horsepower.
Pro-Touring 1972 Ford F-100 Ranger XLT 11 photos
Pro-Touring 1972 Ford F-100 Ranger XLTPro-Touring 1972 Ford F-100 Ranger XLTPro-Touring 1972 Ford F-100 Ranger XLTPro-Touring 1972 Ford F-100 Ranger XLTPro-Touring 1972 Ford F-100 Ranger XLTPro-Touring 1972 Ford F-100 Ranger XLTPro-Touring 1972 Ford F-100 Ranger XLTPro-Touring 1972 Ford F-100 Ranger XLTPro-Touring 1972 Ford F-100 Ranger XLTPro-Touring 1972 Ford F-100 Ranger XLT
The F-100 Ranger XLT from QA1, however, is a little more special. “Don't let the classic truck appearance fool you,” the company highlights on Facebook. “Underneath, he's a fully-equipped corner shredder.”

For starters, coilovers on every corner translate to over-the-top handling for a truck this old. A video from Turnology shows how good it handles on the track, outrunning Corvettes as well as muscle cars with ease.

Filmed last month at the GingerMan Raceway in South Haven, the F-100 further boasts integrated ball joints for the control arms, Wilwood six-piston brake calipers for the front axle and four pistons out back, and 14-inch rotors all around. The wheels and tires - Rocket Racing Attacks wrapped in Nitto NT555s drag radials – should be mentioned too. But what about the engine?

Pop the hood and you’ll be greeted by the bellow of a 410-cubic-inch V8 with aluminum heads from Edelbrock, a Holley 750 carburetor, and MSD ignition. The 6.7-liter plant also features a hydraulic roller camshaft from COMP, and it’s rated at around 500 horsepower and 500 pound-feet of torque.

An AOD-series transmission does the shifting, sending the goodies to the Quick Performance 9.0-inch rear end with the help of a QA1 carbon-fiber driveshaft. Yes, that carbon fiber you usually see in exotic supercars!

The aftermarket company put this fellow together for the purpose of testing new products, but all things considered, it’s an impressive pro-touring build given its on-track performance. Even more impressive is that the F-100 Ranger XLT made the nine-hour trip from QA1 headquarters in Minneapolis to southwest Michigan without skipping a beat, proving that it’s a streetable too.

Having mentioned the carbon driveshaft earlier, care to guess how much the Custom REV Series upgrade costs? The 2.25-inch version is $845 at the time of writing while a diameter of 3.2 inches levels up to $1,345.
 
QA1's '72 Ford F100 attacks GingerMan

QA1's '72 Ford F100 attacks GingerMan---evidence that trucks can handle.

Posted by Turnology on Wednesday, July 29, 2020
 

Don't let New Blue's old classic truck appearance fool you. Underneath, he's a fully equipped corner shredder. 

Posted by QA1 on Friday, July 31, 2020


 
 
 
 
 

Would you like AUTOEVOLUTION to send you notifications?

You will only receive our top stories