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This 1970 Dodge Challenger Abandoned in a Junkyard Could Make a Grown Man Cry

It goes without saying that the 1970 Dodge Challenger is one of the most sought-after cars, especially when it comes in tip-top shape, and collectors are willing to pay big money just to be able to park an original example in their garage.
1970 Dodge Challenger 11 photos
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But on the other hand, it’s also not a secret that an unmolested Challenger in mint condition and with original everything is worth a small fortune, so the more affordable way to go for many people is to just get a project car and then restore it to factory specifications.

The Challenger that we have here appears to check all the boxes when it comes to a solid candidate for a restoration, though as you’ll figure out by simply checking out the photos in the gallery, the car requires plenty of work to get back in tip-top shape.

First and foremost, this Challenger looks like it’s been sitting for a long time in what appears to be a junkyard, so yes, the rust should be a big concern for whoever decides to buy it.

Very little has been shared about the overall condition, and eBay seller cccr3116 says the car comes with a clean title, though no other information has been provided.

So for example, we don’t know for sure if an engine is still there under the hood, though judging from the tags on the body, the Challenger left the factory with a V8 unit responsible for putting the wheels in motion.

But on the other hand, it’s still a first-gen Challenger, so if you’re looking for a project car that really deserves a second chance, this one right here is definitely worth checking out.

And as it turns out, quite a lot of people think the same, as this Challenger has already received over 20 bids since the auction started a few days ago. The top bid at the time of writing is a little over $3,000.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third party.

 
 
 
 
 

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