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This 1968 Camaro Restomod Has an Oldsmobile Surprise in the Middle, Not the Front
Back in 2020, the internet lost its collective mind when it got a look at a rendering of a mid-engine C8 Corvette with a modern Camaro's front fascia grafted onto it. That render is still as stunning as ever two years later.

This 1968 Camaro Restomod Has an Oldsmobile Surprise in the Middle, Not the Front

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But what if we told you someone had the same idea over 20 years ago and actually managed to bring it to life? Would you call us liars or maybe even fools? Well, not so fast, have a look at this 1968 Camaro with its engine in the absolute last place you'd expect it to be.

Entering our mortal realm thanks to Centerline Vehicle Designs of Boone, North Carolina, this restomod is so different from its base car that it might as well be a different species. The process that went into building every last nut and bolt of this remarkable machine is a story of master mechanics with space-age IQs, elite skilled custom fabricators, and a profound love of doing less-traveled things on the road.

It started with what must have been a perfectly normal 1968 Camaro coupe. One can only assume it wasn't a rare model with a 396-cubic inch (6.5-liter) V8 or anything crazy of the sort, as those are surely worth saving. It's more likely the case that it was a lower-trim model with the smaller 302-cubic inch (five-liter) V8.

In any case, the first order of business on this built was to take all of the original innards and promptly throw them in a dumpster. Everything from the drivetrain to the interior and even the chassis underneath was removed to make way for a litany of new components that'd be the envy of any custom build.


Aftermarket performance chassis swaps are all the rage these days in restomod circles, and many opt for established brands like Art Morrison to supply them. But remember, that's a largely modern phenomenon. Back in the 90s, the best most could hope for was to build their own custom chassis using the front and rear sub-frames from the original car. With this being the case, that's precisely what's been done with this Camaro.

Couple that with a fully-custom extended and widened body, and you have a recipe for something that looked wicked before it was even finished. Said body actually received donor panels from other OEM Chevy cars like a 1990 Lumina of all things. All alongside custom fabricated panels that come together to make a perfect cradle for what was to find itself home under its rear hatch.

It's a GM-sourced motor just like the factory car, but in this case, it's an Oldsmobile unit. A 455-cubic inch (7.45-liter) V8 monster most famous for its use in the 442 muscle car and the Delta 88 family sedan. Power is fed through to a three-speed TH-425 automatic transmission sourced from an Oldsmobile Toronado.

It may have been a gearbox more suited for long-distance cruising than raw performance, but considering it's been in this car for almost a quarter-century, we doubt it's of much hindrance. The car's bits and pieces underneath the body are equally lovely, including fully independent suspension in the front and rear with front tubular upper and lower control arms with spindles sourced from a 1985 Monte Carlo. It's all backed up by a full four-disc brake conversion to make this car stop as well as it accelerates.

Inside, we find an equally fully custom interior complete with bolstered cloth-stitched Recaro bucket seats, a B&M shifter, fully functioning air conditioning, power windows, and an aftermarket stereo with speakers custom mounted in the roof-lining. All in all, this has to be one of the most innovative, impressive, and spectacular restomods we've ever seen come across our screens.

With the final gavel hammer smashing at a sale of $88,888 on Bring a Trailer mere minutes ago, whoever picks up this ride got away like a gangbuster for that price. Check out the link to the official BaT page if you want to learn more about what went into making this dream machine a reality.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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