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This 1962 Impala Was a Hardtop, Now It's Bubble Top and Has a Massive V8

In 1958, Bill Mitchell became vice president of design at General Motors. He created the bubble top design and introduced it in 1961. However, in 1962, that unique greenhouse shape was reserved only for the Biscayne and the Bel Air versions. On the other hand, the Impala had to stick with a squared roof design even though it was considered an upmarket version.
1962 Chevrolet Impala Bubble Top 11 photos
1962 Chevrolet Impala converted into Bubble Top1962 Chevrolet Impala converted into Bubble Top1962 Chevrolet Impala converted into Bubble Top1962 Chevrolet Impala converted into Bubble Top1962 Chevrolet Impala converted into Bubble Top1962 Chevrolet Impala converted into Bubble Top1962 Chevrolet Impala converted into Bubble Top1962 Chevrolet Impala converted into Bubble Top1962 Chevrolet Impala converted into Bubble Top1962 Chevrolet Impala converted into Bubble Top
The Impala you see here started its life in 1962 as a Hardtop version. Yet, someone was so in love with the bubble top greenhouse that it replaced it with a Bel Air roof and pillars. So, the car went through a strip-down and rebuilt process, bringing this torch-red paint. Also, all the interior trims were adjusted and custom-made to fit the new roof design.

There is a long list of modifications. We know that sometimes people are going only a few steps when upgrading a car they own. Others, on the other hand, are going all the way, like on this fine example.

You can't say that this car's design is somehow subtle. First, the hood had to be modified to make room for the new Holley carburetors and air filters, which sat on top of an Edelbrock cross-ram intake. Next, the original engine was replaced by a 496 CI (8.1-liter) V8 powerplant. Again, it is not a stock version but a highly tuned one. It features Comp Cam roller camshafts, tubular headers, and an aluminum radiator. As expected, the ignition was upgraded to modern-era with an MSD kit.

1962 Chevrolet Impala converted into Bubble Top
Such an engine couldn't be left paired with an old three-speed gearbox, so the following modification was to match it to a four-speed Muncie manual transmission. It sent the power to a 9" Positraction rear end with a 3.53:1 gearing. Like we said, the builder went all the way and installed stiffened CPP suspension components in all corners.

Stopping power is ensured by discs in all corners, and all of them are ventilated but not cross-drilled or slated. The previous owner who made the modifications chose a set of 20" Billet Specialties wearing Nitto tires for the wheels.

Changes continued on the inside, where the front bench was replaced by a pair of bucket seats. The floor-mounted Hurst shifter. While we've seen many restomods before where builders installed touchscreen displays in cars older than Apollo 11. This bubble top Impala features a set of Dakota Digital gauges that fit into the original opening. Also, a perfect match was for the stereo with Bluetooth connectivity that perfectly matched the gap left by the former radio.

A red vinyl upholstery covered the interior, and it is matched with red carpets. That much red might hurt some, but this combination looks perfect on this vehicle. Maybe it wouldn't look that good if it was on a first-generation Ford Bronco, but here it's just great.

This build is up for sale by JEclassics in Denver, and with three days to go, the price is just $15,000 but expect to climb higher in the last day, as usual.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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