autoevolution
 
1959 Chevrolet Impala convertible
1958 was the year when the Chevrolet Impala nameplate came to be. It was originally just the top-of-the-line Bel Air, but given the unexpected early success it recorded, the GM brand had just one decision to take.

This 1959 Chevrolet Impala Provides an Inestimable Look at the Birth of a Superstar

1959 Impala1959 Impala1959 Impala1959 Impala1959 Impala1959 Impala1959 Impala1959 Impala1959 Impala1959 Impala1959 Impala1959 Impala1959 Impala1959 Impala1959 Impala1959 Impala1959 Impala1959 Impala1959 Impala1959 Impala1959 Impala1959 Impala1959 Impala
Beginning in 1959, the Impala was playing solo, as it was now a standalone series separate from the Bel Air. The Impala and the Bel Air, however, continued to share the same platform, engines, and looks for a little longer, though.

The Impala lineup now included more versions, such as a four-door hardtop, a four-door sedan, a two-door coupe, and a convertible.

The production figures, however, speak for themselves and show the Impala was quite a hit from the very beginning. The GM brand built no more, no less than 473,000 Impalas for the model year 1959, with the convertible among the rarest body styles that got to see the daylight as part of what’s considered the second generation.

As far as the engines go, the Impala was available with either six-cylinder or V8 units. The latter are the ones that ended up securing the lion’s share for this model year, with Chevrolet offering two choices, namely the Turbo-Fire 283 (4.7-liter) and the 348 (5.7-liter).

When it comes to the 283, the base version was the two-barrel unit that developed 185 horsepower, while the upgraded Super Turbo-Fire sibling came with a four-barrel carburetor for a maximum output of 230 horsepower. A fuel-injected Ramjet configuration was also available with 250 horsepower.

The 348 was the engine that turned the Impala into a beast. The power ratings started at 250 horsepower on the four-barrel carburetor unit and went all the way up to 335 horsepower on the Super Turbo-Thrust unit introduced late in the model year.

1959 Impala
If you want to get a taste of what the 1959 Impala was all about, this convertible right here is your best option.

This professionally-restored example comes with everything you’d ever need, including not only stunning looks but also everything in mint and perfect working condition.

Painted in Snowcrest White and sporting a Red Deluxe interior, this Impala looks like a brand-new car, and the living proof is the awards it has already received. The folks over at Crown Dodge Chrysler Jeep Ram, who hope they can find a new home for the car, claim this Impala is the AACA senior first prize winner, and this says a lot about the quality of the restoration it received.

As you’d imagine, everything is gorgeous, and the white power top not only works perfectly but it also looks unbelievable. And of course, the buyer is also getting the full package, which includes a heater defroster and a cigar lighter, dual rear deck antennas, and the factory AM radio and tissue dispenser.

1959 Impala
Now let’s talk engines.

The unit in charge of putting the wheels in motion on this Impala is a 348 with factory Tri-Power, and the garage says the transmission is the rare 4-speed manual. Both are the original units that came with the car.

As you’d imagine, this Impala is ready to go pretty much anywhere, as it starts, runs, and drives like a 2022 model. But on the other hand, getting your hands on it isn’t going to be as easy as you expect it to be.

This is because such a rare gem obviously doesn’t come cheap, and this is the reason we said not everybody can turn this Impala into a dream coming true. Any collector who’s willing to spend a small fortune on this car must know the Impala sells for $300,000, and if this helps convince your wife, some financing options are also available.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

Would you like AUTOEVOLUTION to send you notifications?

You will only receive our top stories