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This 1956 Ford Fairlane Victoria Coupe Still Features the Original Invoice

Not to be confused with the Fairlane line of vehicles for the Australian market, the full-size car for North America replaced the Crestline series in 1955. The Victoria hardtop coupe in the gallery is one of the best-preserved examples from the first generation of the Fairlane, and believe it or not, this blast from the past still features the original invoice.
1956 Ford Fairlane Victoria Coupe 21 photos
1956 Ford Fairlane Victoria Coupe1956 Ford Fairlane Victoria Coupe1956 Ford Fairlane Victoria Coupe1956 Ford Fairlane Victoria Coupe1956 Ford Fairlane Victoria Coupe1956 Ford Fairlane Victoria Coupe1956 Ford Fairlane Victoria Coupe1956 Ford Fairlane Victoria Coupe1956 Ford Fairlane Victoria Coupe1956 Ford Fairlane Victoria Coupe1956 Ford Fairlane Victoria Coupe1956 Ford Fairlane Victoria Coupe1956 Ford Fairlane Victoria Coupe1956 Ford Fairlane Victoria Coupe1956 Ford Fairlane Victoria Coupe1956 Ford Fairlane Victoria Coupe1956 Ford Fairlane Victoria Coupe1956 Ford Fairlane Victoria Coupe1956 Ford Fairlane Victoria Coupe1956 Ford Fairlane Victoria Coupe
RK Motors Charlotte, the selling vendor, describes chassis number M6DV222852 as “fully documented” because the dealer invoice is complemented by the original service policy, owner’s manual, a stack of service records, detailed ownership history, and the Continental kit.

Following a comprehensive restoration of the exterior and interior, the 1956 model currently wears Peacock Blue and Colonial White paintwork over Peacock Blue and Colonial White vinyl for the dashboard, seats, door cards, and even the steering wheel rim. 15-inch wire wheels are joined by whitewall tires and the factory fender skirts, and the engine bay is cleaner than you’d expect - although the exhaust manifold exhibits some corrosion.

Augmented by Thunderbird valve covers, the 292-cu in V8 from the Thunderbird used to belt out 193 horsepower and 280 pound-feet (380 Nm) of torque when it was brand-spanking new. The Y-block engine with 4.8 liters of displacement was introduced in 1954 as the successor to the Flathead V8 from the 1930s. The Ford Motor Company pulled the plug on this design in 1964 in favor of the FE and small-block Windsor families.

A classic which is guaranteed to turn heads, the Fairlane Victoria in the following video is pretty antiquated in terms of cog-swapping duties too. Shifting comes courtesy of a two-speed automatic, the Ford-O-Matic designed by the Warner Gear division of the Borg-Warner Corporation.

Curious about pricing? Despite the originality of the car and the money spent on restoring this four-wheeled time capsule, the North Carolina-based dealership is asking $46,900 or $422 per month over 120 months with 20 percent down. For reference, the Mustang Mach-E starts at $42,895, while the Expedition will set you back $49,995, excluding destination charge.

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Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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