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This 1952 Chevrolet Pickup Is Viciously Low, Could Probably Be Used as a Lawnmower

1952 Chevrolet 3100 7 photos
Photo: Mecum
1952 Chevrolet 31001952 Chevrolet 31001952 Chevrolet 31001952 Chevrolet 31001952 Chevrolet 31001952 Chevrolet 3100
It's common practice for custom garages to gift the rides they work on with a very low stance. After all, what's not to like about an old-school American vehicle that seems to scrape the asphalt as it moves along? But how about a custom ride looking ready to mow the grass?
That's the first thing that popped into my head as soon as I set my eyes on this custom 1952 Chevrolet pickup truck (and also one of the several things that seem to be making the build special). My imagination was aided, naturally, by the fact the thing was parked on a lawn for the photoshoot, and the suspension system was at the lowest setting.

The Advance Design truck we have here is something we regularly come across in the custom world. The range, which was introduced by Chevy as the first major redesign of the pickup bloodline following the Second World War, speaks volumes to the custom builders and collectors of today, who seem to spare no expense in making and buying them.

The example we have here was originally produced in 1952, close to the end of the Advance Design life - trucks of this family were made from 1947 to 1955. We have no information of how and where it spend its life, but we do know it now presents itself as the result of a frame-off restoration.

The crew responsible for the transformation of the Chevy from stylish workhorse to show-goer remains unknown, but the truck just surfaced as being for sale during the Mecum auction that will be held in July in Kissimmee, Florida.

Not many of the technical specs of the truck have been made public. Its matte blue exterior, adorned with the word Wingback on the doors, shields a black interior with bucket seats and a tilt steering column. The chrome wheels of undisclosed size and steered by means of a woodgrain rimmed wheel.

As they came out the factory doors the Advance Design trucks hid under their hoods engines ranging in size from 216 to 261ci. This one, however, packs a 350ci powerplant whose power ratings have not been disclosed. Quite an impressive setup for a lawnmower, don't you think?

Last but not least, there is the obvious fitting of an air ride suspension system and the apparent lack of a bed at the rear, leaving the chassis back there exposed for anyone to see.

Mecum will send this truck under the hammer on July 13, but makes no mention of how much the owner expects to get for it. There seems to be an undisclosed reserve set for it.

Just to give you an idea of what to expect, consider the fact valuation specialist Hagerty placed the worth of an Advance Design 3100 truck from 1952 at $66,000.
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About the author: Daniel Patrascu
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Daniel loves writing (or so he claims), and he uses this skill to offer readers a "behind the scenes" look at the automotive industry. He also enjoys talking about space exploration and robots, because in his view the only way forward for humanity is away from this planet, in metal bodies.
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