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Thieves Love This Video, Any Car Can Be Gone in Under 60 Seconds

A locksmith that runs an honest business in Australia proves just how easy it is to have your car stolen in a minute. He uses publicly available data to get inside a Hyundai and start it. The car’s alarm starts, but it stops in under ten seconds. Fortunately, there is something you can do to prevent the theft.
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Most of us know that cars can be stolen quite easily nowadays if we don’t take care of the keys. You should never leave them on the table at a restaurant or very close to the door when at home. Thieves can copy or even intercept the signal coming from the car key. They take the data, make their version that’s recognized by the car, and then come at night to silently drive away. If you don’t have proper insurance that covers theft (and doesn’t include absurd clauses that may lead to claim rejection), then the car’s most likely lost. There are cases where these stolen cars even manage to be sent outside the owner’s country.

A new video published by the Australian motoring journalists at CarExpert, however, reveals exactly how easy it is to steal a car without having to force your way in. Thieves can either use a device called a “turbo decoder” that can copy the lock’s markings and then cut their copy, or they can go online and find the information that’s needed to make the proper key and the associated code that must be recognized by the car’s software.

The locksmith shows there’s an online database that’s easily accessible by anyone. It contains all the information you need to make a key that’s right for every single vehicle. When it comes to Hyundais, all you need is the VIN. This is usually placed at the bottom of the windshield or can be found by entering the registration plate number on the Government’s dedicated platform.

Once thieves have the VIN, they download the codes from the website, make their own keys, and then come to silently steal your car. The locksmith proves you can shut down the alarm in under ten seconds and all he needs to start the engine are another 30 seconds. Moreover, everything he uses can be easily bought online.

There's no need for intercepting key signals or trying to copy its data by using other expensive devices anymore. Thieves don't even have to make sure the victims are away or asleep.

A car alarm that doesn’t make noise for at least two or three minutes before it starts again is going to be ignored by almost anyone. Nobody’s going to check it if the owner is not paying attention or is not close to the vehicle.

In Hyundai’s case, it might be easier because all that data is easily accessible, but things don’t change when it comes to other car brands. Almost anything can be stolen if the criminals are properly prepared.

The worldwide economy is worsening as each day passes. Many more people may resort to such illegal actions, so you should take all the necessary precautions to avoid having to deal with the Police, the insurance company, and maybe even a lawyer in case your claim is denied or delayed.

Fortunately, newer cars that have over-the-air software (OTA) updates enabled can address these issues with a simple software change. For other cars, you might be forced to either buy a Faraday cage for the vehicle’s keys or use the classic steering wheel lock.

Now watch how easily the locksmith gets inside the car and starts it with a couple of tools anyone can get their hands on.

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