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These Unrestored Ford Mustangs Are Waiting to Regain the Glory They Deserve

It makes little sense to go back to the first half of the ‘60s and discuss the early days of the Mustang because the pony has undoubtedly obtained a well-deserved place in automotive history books.
First-gen Mustangs waiting for a restoration 50 photos
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For collectors, however, the first-generation Mustang is a model to die for, and if we also add an all-original configuration with the factory engine and everything in tip-top shape, the excitement certainly goes through the roof.

The Mustangs we’re highlighting today are all part of the first-generation Mustang, and more importantly, they’re all unrestored, though as you’ll discover in the next few lines, each comes with its very own pros and cons that a potential buyer would have to deal with.

Especially if what they’re planning is a full restoration to factory specifications, that is, as a restomod is always the more convenient plan B if the engine under the hood is no longer original.

The rough one


First of all, it’s this Mustang whose body barely has any paint but which is ready for a full restoration inside and outside. The owner of the car, who listed it on Craigslist, says the ’65 Mustang left the factory with a 289 under the hood, but the engine putting the wheels in motion right now comes from a 1966 Mustang Convertible.

Several improvements and fixes have already been made, so the Mustang comes with new tires, a new alternator and starter, and a rebuilt carburetor.

The interior is in a rather rough shape, so the buyer would have to replace the headliner and the carpet, with the seats also requiring some fixes.

Needless to say, saving this Mustang will be quite a challenge, and a restomod sounds a lot more convenient than a typical restoration to factory specifications. You can take this one home for $5,500.

1965 Ford Mustang

The all-original one


Then, it’s this 1966 Mustang that comes with a 6-cylinder under the hood but whose engine condition is as mysterious as it gets.

The seller of the car says they planned to restore it but eventually gave up on the idea, and despite claiming they “had it since day one,” the Craigslist listing indicates the Mustang is currently at the second owner.

The good news is the vehicle is all-original and drives good, with the odometer said to indicate some 81,000 miles (130,000 km), though again, we’re not being told if this is the actual mileage or not.

The overall condition of Mustang is fairly decent, though the body still needs some fixes and a full repaint is likely required. This is something that should be easier to determine after a physical inspection, and this is obviously recommended, especially because at the first glance, no major areas affected by rust seem to be visible in the photos.

This Mustang can be yours for $14,900, and at the first glance, this is a little ambitious, especially since it’s a six-cylinder hiding under the hood.

1966 Ford Mustang six\-cylinder

The abandoned one


And last but not least, here’s a 1966 Mustang fastback that’s been sitting since 2004, so it no longer runs. The 289 under the hood is paired with a 5-speed transmission, but the owner hasn’t provided other specifics about the powertrain, so it’s hard to tell if it needs to be completely rebuilt or small fixes would be enough to get it to start again.

The body, on the other hand, looks pretty good, and the Craigslist seller explains that everything is still there. So in other words, it’s a complete Mustang that’s been abandoned for way too many years but which is now ready to get back on the road after receiving the proper fixes.

This time, the Mustang is ready to change homes for as much as $33,500.

1966 Ford Mustang fastback


Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third party.

 
 
 
 
 

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