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These Two 1967 Ford Mustangs Parked in a Field Won’t Go Anywhere Alone

If you’re searching for a 1967 Mustang to restore, here’s an offer that might be very hard to refuse. Someone is selling not one, but two ’67 Mustangs, and both seem to be coming in a pretty solid condition, therefore checking many of the boxes for a restoration candidate.
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However, as you can figure out by yourselves from the photo gallery included in the article, the two Mustangs come with their own set of pros and cons.

First and foremost, it’s pretty clear the cars have been sitting for a while, and despite the photo showing them parked on a field, eBay seller dama-3697 claims there’s no rust on them.

Of course, you should still check everything, especially the floors and the trunk, thoroughly, because these are the places most often invaded by rust on vehicles sitting for a long time in areas with lots of vegetation.

The C-coded Mustangs obviously don’t come in a perfect shape, but they still look rather solid, and the majority of the interior parts appear to be there. Again, this is something that can only be determined with a thorough visual inspection, especially if what you’re planning is to use one of the Mustangs as a parts car for the other.

As for what’s under the hood, the red model hides a mysterious engine, while the blue one hides nothing but fresh air. So the blue Mustang no longer has an engine, while the eBay summary seems to indicate the red one comes with a 302 (4.9-liter) V8 inside.

If this is indeed accurate, then the engine has already been replaced, as the 1967 Mustang wasn’t offered with a 302 V8. This Windsor unit was introduced a year later for the model year 1968, and it was available with either 2-barrel and 4-barrel.

The seller also claims both Mustangs are C-coded, so in theory, a 289 (4.7-liter) V8 should be there.

But at the end of the day, the pair is still worth checking out, especially for someone planning to restore a 1967 Mustang. The pricing, on the other hand, is a little bit too ambitious, as the bidding starts at $20,000, with no reserve in place.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third party.

 
 
 
 
 

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