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The World Will Have to Wait a Little Longer for Range Rover and Jaguar XJ EVs

The only electric vehicle in Jaguar Land Rover's portfolio right now is the Jaguar I-Pace crossover thingy. Despite its somewhat underwhelming figures - particularly in the range department - the battery-powered model is very much beloved by its owners.
Range Rover Nouvel Concept rendering 16 photos
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Available since 2018, the I-Pace made Jaguar one of the first European carmakers to offer a purpose-built EV, particularly in the premium segment. Audi, Mercedes-Benz, and Porsche were yet to launch their first dedicated electric models, with BMW's i3 the only one available on the market. Hardly a competitor for the much larger and sportier I-Pace.

Jaguar Land Rover is determined to continue down the electrification route, and after introducing hybrid options to a lot of its models, the next step should have been the introduction of all-electric models for both the Range Rover and Jaguar brands (a mystery model and the all-new XJ, respectively). And it still is, except reportedly it has been pushed back a little.

British media outlet Autocar claims to have read transcripts of a conference call between Jaguar Land Rover CFO Adrian Mardell and some investors, revealing the release of these two battery-powered vehicles has been delayed by two months due to implications from the global health crisis. Instead of the launches planned for August and September, the new schedule now indicates the months of October and November.

The two models share more than just their parent company: they are both developed on JLR's new MLA (Modular Longitudinal Architecture) platform. The MLA will host all future Jaguar Land Rover models including BEVs, PHEVs, and MHEVs.

Nobody knows exactly what to expect from these two models, with rumors claiming they will have a battery pack of nearly 90 kWh, much like the one in the I-Pace. However, potential customers should be relieved to know that despite having the same capacity, the pack used in the upcoming XJ and Range Rover will be a new one. Hopefully, that will reflect in the maximum range of the two EVs, since their larger size and weight surplus compared to the Jaguar I-Pace won't do anything to help there.

Speaking of size, the electric Range Rover model is believed to be roughly the same size as a Velar, perhaps just a tad lower. If you feel that has "urban SUV" written all over it, you're probably right. Considering the battery pack lives under the floor, the only way JLR could make the already sleek Velar even lower would be by reducing the ground clearance. Anyway, it's not like the Velar is built for off-roading, so why should an electric version be any different?

The conference also revealed some details about Jaguar Land Rover's financial situation. It would seem the global problems have taken their toll on the British manufacturer, but contingency plans are in place. Mardell says the company can do more than survive with no more than 500,000 units sold per year, though he expects that number to grow over the coming years thanks in no small part to the new Land Rover Defender.

Editor's note: Range Rover Nouvel Concept rendering pictured in the gallery

 
 
 
 
 

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