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The World Should Be Ashamed This 1972 Mustang Mach 1 Ended Up in Such Horrible Condition

It doesn’t make much sense to discuss the legacy of the Mach 1 in the automotive world, but the example you’re about to check out still requires reviewing some of the most important details.
1972 Ford Mustang Mach 1 15 photos
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The Mach 1 was born in 1969, and it was from the very beginning a major hit. In fact, it was so successful that it turned the Mustang GT into a redundant product, and a close look at the sales numbers proves this.

Ford sold close to 72,500 Mach 1s in 1969, whereas the GT accounted for just a little over 5,000 units of the total Mustang sales.

Easily distinguished by the 63C code on the door data plate, the Mach 1 received a facelift in 1971 – you can identify this model by the 05 VIN code and the 63R body code on the door tag – just like the rest of the Mustang lineup. While the facelift brought massive changes, the upgrade that everybody ended up loving was the new hood design with dual scoops, something that easily set the new Mach 1 aside from the crowd.

Now let’s move on to the sad sight you’re about to see when opening the photo gallery.

This 1972 Mustang fastback was born with the Mach 1 package, but as anyone can easily tell with a quick visual inspection, it’s no longer the legend so many people fell in love with.

While eBay seller fordman352 says this Mustang needs a full restoration, there’s no doubt that such a project is going to be a major project, especially as the metal exhibits horrible condition.

Both the engine and the transmission are gone now, but if you’re the kind who sees the glass half-full, then worth knowing is the car was born with the rare 351 (5.7-liter) HO under the hood. It’s believed fewer than 400 units ended up seeing the daylight with this engine option.

At the end of the day, this rare legend probably deserves a full restoration, but finding someone to give it a second chance is going to be a challenge, especially given the car doesn’t sell for cheap. The bidding has already reached $1,000, but of course, a reserve is also in place, and it hasn’t been triggered.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third party.

 
 
 
 
 

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