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The Remarkable Miura P400 SV Is Lamborghini's Genuine "Raging Bull"

Lamborghini's raging bull is one of the most recognizable logos in the world nowadays – we've grown accustomed to associating it with pure power, classiness, and luxury. One of Lamborghini's vehicles, even more closely associated with a bull, is the Miura. Today, I'd like to tell you more about the story of the Miura and its SV version.
1971 Lamborghini Miura P400 SV 60 photos
Photo: RM Sotheby's
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The vehicle gets its name from a breed of fighting bulls originating from Ganadería Miura, or the Miura Cattle Ranch, in Seville, Spain, known for their size and ferocity. Ferruccio Lamborghini was so impressed with the animals that he decided to make the raging bull a symbol for all his machines. The names for some of his models, such as the Murcielago or the Reventon, were also inspired by certain fighting bulls.

Lamborghini started production for the Miura P400 in 1966 and managed to create a machine that lived up to its namesake. The vehicle innovated the sports car market in multiple ways – the mid/rear-mounted V12 engine gave the car high-performance capabilities, especially for its time. But perhaps what really caught the eye of car enthusiasts was the voluptuous coachwork designed by Bertone's Marcello Gandini, which offered the car exquisite styling, a bit reminiscent of a lean and muscular bull. If you were to choose a Lamborghini model that looks most like a bull, this is it.

In March 1970, the Italian marque introduced a revised P400 S variant with a slightly tweaked exterior and a modified 3.9-liter V12 engine equipped with larger intake manifolds and upgraded camshafts. The engine outputted 370 ps (272 kW or 365 hp) and 268 Nm (198 lb-ft) of torque. Compared to the original Miura, the S version enjoyed an increase of 20 ps (14.7 kW or 19.7 hp) and 33 Nm (24.3 lb-ft).

However, the most sought-after version, even to this day, is the P400 SV, the final iteration of the Miura – basically, it's the Miura S, but refined once again. By the way, the SV stands for Spinto Veloce, which can be best translated as "tuned for speed" or "tuned fast." Released a year after its predecessor, the P400 SV was available by special order only, and its name instantly clarified that it was the most advanced Miura to be released.

1971 Lamborghini Miura P400 SV
Photo: RM Sotheby's
The P400 SV stood out from its siblings in multiple ways – to accommodate the extra power, several modifications needed to be made. The chassis was reinforced, and the rear suspension was upgraded with larger wishbones. Furthermore, larger wheels were fitted and Lamborghini designed the model with a wider rear track. Consequently, it tweaked the P400 SV's body and added wider rear fenders, making the car look even more muscular than the original design. The proprietary V12 engine was again tuned to develop 15 hp more than the P400 S, bringing the total power up to 385 ps (283 kW or 380 hp).

According to different sources, the total number of Miuras manufactured stands at around 700-800 units. Most of them were standard models, while the P400 S and P400 SV variants were manufactured in modest quantities of about 150 units each.

Of course, given the relatively low production numbers, getting your hands on a Miura nowadays is costly, especially when we're talking about a P400 SV model. Recently, one such example with particularly stunning styling was sold by an auction house in Phoenix, Arizona. How much do you think the new owner paid for it? Before you delve too deep into thought, let me tell you more about this specific example – I promise I'll reveal the price at the end.

This example boasts the chassis number 4926 – as you can expect, the machine hasn't preserved its original condition. As much as you try to take care of a car, some components must be replaced for a pleasurable and safe ride.

1971 Lamborghini Miura P400 SV
Photo: RM Sotheby's
According to Simon Kidston's Miura registry, chassis number 4926 completed factory assembly in November 1971, finished in Giallo Sole paint and upholstered with Nero leather. Given that it was one of the later Miura examples, this unit has the desirable split-sump lubrication system. Moreover, there's a high chance that the factory installed the currently equipped A/C system.

Let me tell you more about this specific example – it's believed that this Miura was distributed to the Rome-based dealer Carpanelli for an Italian client living in Louisiana. After being part of collections in Florida and Idaho, Bill Young of Arizona acquired it in 1990.

The car then changed ownership to renowned dealer/film producer Randy Simon, who commissioned a complete refurbishment. Of course, given the rarity and intricacies of the car, he had to choose an appropriate team for this restoration. That turned out to be the Bobileff Motorcar Company in San Diego, which specializes in restoring classic Lamborghinis.

The process took about four years, and both mechanical and cosmetic aspects of the vehicle were addressed. Bob Wallace, the former racing driver and Lamborghini factory test driver/engineer, fully rebuilt the V12 engine. What's more, this is where the coachwork got the breathtaking design it currently boasts – it was repainted in the lovely shade of Blue Notte (midnight blue). The interior was retrimmed in light gray leather with complementary dark blue carpeting. I don't know about you, but I can hardly take my eyes off this color scheme.

1971 Lamborghini Miura P400 SV
Photo: RM Sotheby's
After being presented at several concours events and snatching a few wins, this vehicle was sold to the current owner in early 2011. Two years later, it underwent another restoration process, and the transmission, carburetors, and master cylinder were rebuilt. Moreover, the wiring system was repaired, a Tubi Style exhaust was fitted, and the A/C was charged.

Until November of last year, the car was kept in climate-controlled storage, and it underwent a fluid service to ensure optimum operation. This 1971 Miura P400 SV is an excellent addition to any enthusiast's collection, especially since it retains part of the original componentry. The car sold last week for $3.58M (€3.28M) – its value will only increase over time, as it is a valuable part of Lamborghini's history.
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About the author: Mircea Mazuru
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Starting out with a motorcycle permit just because he could get one two years earlier than a driver's license, Mircea keeps his passion for bikes (motor or no motor) alive to this day. His lifelong dream is to build his own custom camper van.
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