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The Mountain Tiny Home Is Minuscule, Has Glass Roof and Skylight Shower
Life is better on wheels, reads a small note on one of the cedar-clad walls of a tiny house ironically called The Mountain. If the wheels in question are attached to something as delightfully elegant and cozy as this tiny, that note is the truth.

The Mountain Tiny Home Is Minuscule, Has Glass Roof and Skylight Shower

The Mountain is a repurposed mobile hunting cabin turned into a gorgeous tinyThe Mountain is a repurposed mobile hunting cabin turned into a gorgeous tinyThe Mountain is a repurposed mobile hunting cabin turned into a gorgeous tinyThe Mountain is a repurposed mobile hunting cabin turned into a gorgeous tinyThe Mountain is a repurposed mobile hunting cabin turned into a gorgeous tinyThe Mountain is a repurposed mobile hunting cabin turned into a gorgeous tinyThe Mountain is a repurposed mobile hunting cabin turned into a gorgeous tinyThe Mountain is a repurposed mobile hunting cabin turned into a gorgeous tinyThe Mountain is a repurposed mobile hunting cabin turned into a gorgeous tinyThe Mountain is a repurposed mobile hunting cabin turned into a gorgeous tinyThe Mountain is a repurposed mobile hunting cabin turned into a gorgeous tiny
Tiny homes are having quite a moment right now, along with other means of long-distance, long-term transportation, like RVs and motorhomes, campers, vans and trailers, and everything in between. The reality is that, even before the international health crisis of 2020 hit, tiny houses were somewhat of a trend. The desire for something different but still safe and the increased chances of working from home have only helped with it.

Cody Makarevitz is the man behind CoMak Tiny Homes from Lancaster, Pennsylvania. He declares himself a longtime fan of tinies, though he’s not particularly interested in the majority being built these days. They are massive in size, despite their name and, more importantly, they cost more than an actual house on land.

With this in mind, Makarevitz set out to create his own tiny and, in the process, he tells New Atlas, prove that a tiny home can still be cozy, elegant, and quite sufficient despite the small footprint. And make no mistake about it, The Mountain is tiny with a capital T.

Made from an old mobile hunting cabin (hence its ironic moniker), The Mountain sits on a small double-axle trailer and offers a living space of just 150 square feet (13.95 square meters). It’s very compact but, despite this, it doesn’t feel stuffed or lacking in creature comforts. That’s because Makarevitz made sure to allow as much natural light in as possible and used certain gimmicks, like wall-mounted mirrors and hidden storage, to create the impression of more space.

The Mountain also has sliding doors at the rear, in what would be the living room, and they open all the way to the exterior. In good weather, you can simply slide them open, and you’re effectively blurring the line between interior space, such as it is, and the great outdoors. Otherwise, plenty of glazing will help maximize available space.

Inside, you get a living room with a wooden bench and one of those rustic swivel chairs with plenty of throw pillows, simply inviting you to relax and unwind after a day’s work. The miniature kitchen is to the right, together with a dining table and seating for two. At the opposite end is the shower, completely encased in cedar and with a skylight that will make you feel like you’re showering outside.

There is no actual bathroom, so Makarevitz had to get creative for the toilet. It sits behind a privacy curtain right in front of the sink and behind the bar/dining table, which effectively means you have to go potty right there in the kitchen. No one said sacrifices weren’t made when designing a tiny home so… tiny.

The loft includes a king-size mattress and another skylight. The designer and builder tells the same media outlet he’s always loved stargazing and outdoor showers, so this was the perfect chance to bring both of them indoors, for those times when the weather might not allow either.

In addition to the composting toilet, The Mountain comes with a freshwater tank and, while it was not designed with solar panels and off-grid capabilities in mind, it can be retrofitted. It also has a heat pump and water heater and is, at least in theory, suitable for all-season use.

“I wanted to build this model as a contradiction to the extra-large tiny houses I see being made and sold,” Makarevitz explains. “They seem to be getting larger and more expensive each year as the movement grows. I wanted to bring it back to the roots a bit. Tiny for tininess sake.”

Considering his stated mission, The Mountain is a success: he built it for an estimated $20,000, completed it in September last year, and then sold it for $35,000. More importantly, he’s learned enough from the experience to have already started working on version two, which, he says, will be based on a larger trailer so as to add a bit more space to the bathroom.



Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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