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The Last Austin-Healey 3000 Mk III Ever Produced Heads To Auction

1967 Austin-Healey 3000 Mk III 31 photos
Photo: Classic Car Auctions
1967 Austin-Healey 3000 Mk III1967 Austin-Healey 3000 Mk III1967 Austin-Healey 3000 Mk III1967 Austin-Healey 3000 Mk III1967 Austin-Healey 3000 Mk III1967 Austin-Healey 3000 Mk III1967 Austin-Healey 3000 Mk III1967 Austin-Healey 3000 Mk III1967 Austin-Healey 3000 Mk III1967 Austin-Healey 3000 Mk III1967 Austin-Healey 3000 Mk III1967 Austin-Healey 3000 Mk III1967 Austin-Healey 3000 Mk III1967 Austin-Healey 3000 Mk III1967 Austin-Healey 3000 Mk III1967 Austin-Healey 3000 Mk III1967 Austin-Healey 3000 Mk III1967 Austin-Healey 3000 Mk III1967 Austin-Healey 3000 Mk III1967 Austin-Healey 3000 Mk III1967 Austin-Healey 3000 Mk III1967 Austin-Healey 3000 Mk III1967 Austin-Healey 3000 Mk III1967 Austin-Healey 3000 Mk III1967 Austin-Healey 3000 Mk III1967 Austin-Healey 3000 Mk III1967 Austin-Healey 3000 Mk III1967 Austin-Healey 3000 Mk III1967 Austin-Healey 3000 Mk III1967 Austin-Healey 3000 Mk III
When talking British classics, it’s impossible to ignore the likes of the Jaguar E-Type and Aston Martin DB5. But while those are pop icons in their own right, the Austin-Healey 3000 Mk III is a bit of a specialty.
As compared to Jaguar and Aston Martin, which are still with us, the venture created by Austin and Donald Healey Motor in 1952 came to a conclusion in 1972. The cutesy Sprite is a quintessential product of this legendary link-up, albeit the 3000 Mk III is the car Austin-Healey enthusiasts consider to be the British outfit’s crowning achievement.

17,712 examples of the Mark III were produced from ’64 to ’67, and this here is the last one ever made. Chassis HBJ843025 was manufactured on the 21st of December, 1967, and the current owner bought it 45 years ago. Yup, this is one cherished example of the 3000 Mk III, a back-to-basics sports car to die for. Better still, it has covered only 57,389 miles (92,358 kilometers) over the course of half a century.

“This is the first time the car has been offered for sale in over 40 years and as such an important and iconic British sports car we expect a significant amount of interest,” said Richard Greenhalgh, specialist at Classic Car Auctions. So what’s the estimate on this example of the Big Healey? £75,000 and £90,000 is CCA’s pre-auction estimate, but only time will tell if bidding will get rowdy.

Benefitting from a fresh restoration that finished just a year ago, Healey’s last-ever Mk III is joined by a large history file, lots of documents, and a heritage certificate. Of course, the inline-six powerplant benefits from a high-lift camshaft and SU HS6 carbs, additions that saw power go up from 136 to 150 bhp. And compared to the previous iteration, the Mk III boasts power-assisted brakes as standard.

Last, but not least, it’s noteworthy to point out that this is no garage queen. And even restored, the final Big Healey doesn’t fail to show its patina.
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About the author: Mircea Panait
Mircea Panait profile photo

After a 1:43 scale model of a Ferrari 250 GTO sparked Mircea's interest for cars when he was a kid, an early internship at Top Gear sealed his career path. He's most interested in muscle cars and American trucks, but he takes a passing interest in quirky kei cars as well.
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