autoevolution
Car video reviews:
 
The Hudson Is How You Turn the Shell of a ‘48 Vagabond Trailer Into a Gorgeous Tiny Home
“They don’t make them like they used to” is something we thought at one point only our parents and grandparents would say, but here we are. Proving upcycling can be the best alternative, The Hudson is a gorgeous tiny home that started out as an abandoned and rotten 1948 Vagabond Trailer.

The Hudson Is How You Turn the Shell of a ‘48 Vagabond Trailer Into a Gorgeous Tiny Home

The Hudson is a renovated, restyled 1948 Vagabond trailerThe Hudson is a renovated, restyled 1948 Vagabond trailerThe Hudson is a renovated, restyled 1948 Vagabond trailerThe Hudson is a renovated, restyled 1948 Vagabond trailerThe Hudson is a renovated, restyled 1948 Vagabond trailerThe Hudson is a renovated, restyled 1948 Vagabond trailerThe Hudson is a renovated, restyled 1948 Vagabond trailerThe Hudson is a renovated, restyled 1948 Vagabond trailerThe Hudson is a renovated, restyled 1948 Vagabond trailerThe Hudson is a renovated, restyled 1948 Vagabond trailerThe Hudson is a renovated, restyled 1948 Vagabond trailerThe Hudson is a renovated, restyled 1948 Vagabond trailerThe Hudson is a renovated, restyled 1948 Vagabond trailerThe Hudson is a renovated, restyled 1948 Vagabond trailerThe Hudson is a renovated, restyled 1948 Vagabond trailerThe Hudson is a renovated, restyled 1948 Vagabond trailerThe Hudson is a renovated, restyled 1948 Vagabond trailerThe Hudson is a renovated, restyled 1948 Vagabond trailerThe Hudson is a renovated, restyled 1948 Vagabond trailerThe Hudson is a renovated, restyled 1948 Vagabond trailer
When it comes to vintage trailers, few other U.S. makers can hold a candle to Vagabond Coach Manufacturing Company. Starting out in New Hudson, Michigan, as a buggy manufacturer, Vagabond expanded into trailers at the beginning of 1931 and would continue making them well into the late ‘60s.

Vagabond trailers were elegant, high-quality, very homey mobile homes, offered in a variety of sizes (both length and width) and layouts. The “bread box” shape became an instantly recognizable Vagabond feature, much like the Airstream became famous for its shiny aluminum exterior. Inside, they offered the comforts of home (away from home), including full kitchen, bedroom, living that could double as a guest room, and bathroom, with features like forced-air underfloor heating and quality finishes.

This Vagabond trailer has been around for more than 7 decades, but doesn’t look its age. It doesn’t look like a Vagabond either, but it is still a superb example of upcycling and what you can do in terms of breathing new life into a forgotten classic. It’s aptly called The Hudson and it is the work of Ron and Shayna from Georgia-based Darlin’ Trailers.

Darlin’ Trailers is a company that restores and / or customizes anything from motorhomes to trailers and tiny houses. Founders Ron and Shayna live full time in an RV and, a while back, decided to use their experience to build mobile homes for fellow travelers, while making the most of the source material already available. Clients can either bring their own trailers or they can get assistance in finding the perfect one.

Everything is done in-house over a period of 10 to 15 weeks, with Ron and Shayna handling each project. They say that The Hudson, which was completed in the summer of 2021 and has since left the shop with a new owner, was one of their most challenging to date. When the 1948 Vagabond trailer reached them, it was completely gutted – and not even the shell was much to look at. It was rotten and in bad shape, so work had to start with repairing the frame before they could even think about the interior.

It was well-worth the effort: The Hudson has been turned into a proper tiny home and is a very tasteful example of upcycling. It can sleep up to four people in two separate areas, has a full kitchen, and a full bathroom, in addition to plenty of storage and space to move around. Styling is consistent throughout, elegant and homey without feeling like it’s too much of a show-off, as you might have noticed in other tinies.

That’s because the focus was always on practicality, Ron explains in one of the videos available at the bottom of the page. You can make a trailer or a tiny home a gorgeous one, but good looks mean nothing if there’s no functionality to them. So, he strove to turn this old 23-foot (7-meter) trailer into a proper livable space.

The kitchen is at the front end, with cabinetry from Ikea restyled to fit the curved walls. You get a sink, countertop, induction cooktop and convection oven, and shelving and – perhaps more importantly – enough room to move around comfortably. The living slash dining room doubles for a guest bedroom, as the sofa extends to sleep two. There’s a wall-mounted TV and some storage, too.

The bedroom is separated from the rest of the house with thick curtains, and sits on an elevated platform that integrates more storage. Opposite the large bed is a wardrobe, so you get additional room for all your clothes. The bathroom is at the rear end, and includes a large washbasin with vanity, a toilet, and a penny tile shower with bench seating – a very fancy touch for any type of wheeled home of this size.

Darlin’ Trailers never disclosed a price for The Hudson, but those who find it to their liking can replicate the look of it through a guide that they sell online. Basically, they’re making money both off trailer renovations and from the interior design they create for them. #Vanlife #inspo and all that. Even if you’re only window-shopping, you have to admit that The Hudson makes quite an impression, especially for a trailer this old.







Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

Would you like AUTOEVOLUTION to send you notifications?

You will only receive our top stories