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Unique Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Shooting Brake is Up for Grabs – Video, Photo Gallery

Chassis no. 15275 is one of the most beautiful, pure, and visually enticing Prancing Horses ever to come out of Maranello. Fun fact number one: the 1972 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Shooting Brake was built at an estimated cost of 4 Ferrari Daytona models.
1972 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Shooting Brake 14 photos
1972 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Shooting Brake1972 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Shooting Brake1972 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Shooting Brake1972 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Shooting Brake1972 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Shooting Brake1972 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Shooting Brake1972 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Shooting Brake1972 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Shooting Brake1972 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Shooting Brake1972 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Shooting Brake1972 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Shooting Brake1972 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Shooting Brake1972 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Shooting Brake
Of course, this is a one-off Ferrari. The body shell alone embodies uniqueness. Speaking of the bodywork, Panther Westwinds – a British company, turned aluminum into this hand-built machine. Despite its Italian roots and British exterior design, the 1972 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Shooting Brake was shipped to the United States of America to Chinetti Motors.

Who is this Chinetti, you're asking? While most of us know Luigi Chinetti for importing Ferrari cars, Chinetti also had a knack for racing. Heck, he won the 24 Hours of Le Mans three times, on top of which stand two overall wins at the Spa 24 Hours. Still, the Shooting Brake wasn't bought by Chinetti, but by a real estate developer who wanted something a little bit different. Hence the vehicle's gullwing-style rear side windows instead of the more traditional rear tailgate.

Hexagon Classics doesn't offer an estimate on this coachbuilt masterpiece, but it mentions that the Shooting Brake recently went through a comprehensive restoration at the hands of "the very same artisan who work built the car whilst working at Panther in period." Naturally, the resto job also included a comprehensive mechanical service to ensure that the car purrs like a kitten (or panther) at idle.

Other than the stunning bodywork and the vehicle's singularity, let's not forget that under the hood lies a purebred 4,390 cc V12. Are 352 horsepower and 319 lb-ft (432 Nm) and the howl of a carbureted V12 engine enough to augment the first Ferrari to wear British clothes? Word has it only the windscreen, A-pillars and doors were kept from the Daytona, so the opportunity at hand is an offer collectors simply cannot refuse.

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