autoevolution
Car video reviews:
 

The Android of Electric Vehicles? Foxconn Announces MIH Open Platform for EVs

You may have seen Foxconn in the news and heard about it from phone news. Based in Taiwan, the electronics contract manufacturer produces the iPhone 12 for Apple, and customers also include Huawei, Amazon, Microsoft, Intel, Nintendo, and Sega.
Foxconn MIH Open Platform for EVs with solid-state batteries 6 photos
Foxconn MIH Open Platform for EVs with solid-state batteriesFoxconn MIH Open Platform for EVs with solid-state batteriesFoxconn MIH Open Platform for EVs with solid-state batteriesFoxconn MIH Open Platform for EVs with solid-state batteriesFoxconn MIH Open Platform for EVs with solid-state batteries
You may have also seen a fair bit of negative press about Foxconn. Allegations of poor working conditions, discrimination against Chinese workers versus Taiwanese workers, and suicide cases have attracted the media’s attention, but we aren’t going to open that can of worms on this occasion. Instead, we should be talking about EVs.

MIH is the name of the “software and hardware open platform for electric vehicles” from Foxconn, and it’s dubbed “an important step in the company’s growing EV business.” Like Android, the openness of the platform will allow automakers to make small adjustments depending on body style (sedan or SUV) and application (economy or luxury car). Of course, this openness applies to both the software and the hardware.

The “Android system of the EV industry” has one purpose other than profit. The Taiwanese company intends to accelerate the adoption of electric vehicles, and the timing couldn’t be more perfect. Public concern about climate change is at an all-time high, and internal combustion engines are under pressure from ever-stringent emissions regulations as well as flat-out bans on the sale of fossil-fuel cars.

Remember our story on the United Kingdom's environmental policy from not that long ago? To sum it up nicely, the British government has advanced the ban on internal combustion-engined vehicles to 2030 from the previous target of 2040. Elsewhere in Europe, Noway has voted to ban ICE vehicles in 2025.

Turning our attention back to Foxconn, the technology giant has also announced plans “to debut a commercialized solid-state battery by 2024.” The Taiwanese juggernaut explains says that the solid-state design it’s developing for the MIH platform is “a low-cost solution to the woes of EVs running on liquid-state batteries.”

press release
 
 
 
 
 

Would you like AUTOEVOLUTION to send you notifications?

You will only receive our top stories