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The 2022 Subaru BRZ Is Way Better Than First Gen, Says Doug DeMuro

In the sub-$30,000 sports car segment, your options are pretty limited. The MX-5 Miata comes to mind in the guise of a great overall purchase, but one has to remember that Subaru redesigned the BRZ for MY 2022.
 2022 Subaru BRZ Doug DeMuro review 48 photos
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Yes, it still features the same basic architecture as the first generation. And yes, a six-speed automatic transmission is available as well for people who don’t really understand the purpose of a lightweight sports car. One could also make a case for the Ford Mustang Fastback with the 2.3-liter EcoBoost powerplant, even though it’s not actually a proper competitor for the BRZ.

Despite all the criticism that one can think of, Doug DeMuro is much obliged to report a way better overall package compared to the original. The BRZ adopts a digital instrument cluster and a larger touchscreen, which makes the interior a nicer place to be in. Annoyances include the indicator stalk that returns to the center position and the door locks. More to the point, once you turn off the engine, you have to manually unlock the driver’s door before opening it. A pretty archaic thing for a 2022 model, if you ask me…

DeMuro further demonstrates how useless the rear seats are, which is often the case with 2+2 coupes and convertibles. The double-bubble roof also needs to be mentioned because this design maximizes headroom. As for the driving experience, Doug finds no issue with the 2.4-liter boxer’s torque.

One of the biggest complaints of the previous BRZ with the 2.0-liter engine concerns the lack of grunt. With 184 pound-feet (249 Nm) delivered at 3,700 revolutions per minute compared to 156 pound-feet (212 Nm) at 6,800 rpm, it’s obvious that Subaru made the BRZ feel quicker where it matters.

“The handling is just great,” said the reviewer, adding that “everything feels so good. It inspires so much confidence. It really does.”



 
 
 
 
 

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