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Tesla Model S Coupe Gets Internal Combustion Engine in Drift Car Rendering

The drifting realm gains more traction every year, so you shouldn't be surprised if an insane shop out there comes up with a Tesla Model S drift car one day. Until that happens, we've brought along a render that portrays such a sideways animal.
Tesla Model S drift car render 26 photos
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The pixel play you're looking at will bring EV purists so far outside their comfort zone, that we're expecting the artist behind it to get plenty of pointed fingers online.

For instance, we've seen the Model S getting the coupe treatment before, but this isn't, by far, the most extreme side of the contraption we see here. That title goes to the suck-squeeze-bang-blow motor that has found its way under the hood of the Palo Alto machine.

We must also pay attention to the extreme aero package fitted to the car, which makes it impossible to ignore. Yasid Oozeear is the name of the pixel wielder behind this image, with those tuned into our render tales being familiar with the artist's creations.

Returning to the idea of an actual Model S drift machine, such a contraption would require a hydraulic handbrake and, perhaps, a custom throttle map.

You see, the current setup of the Model S isn't exactly drift-friendly. For one thing, since the EV has a one-speed transmission, losing traction means that the tires will spin to a terrifying rpm, with the electric torque toasting them like nothing else - we found out what happens when you slide a Model S when reviewing a P85 a few years ago.

The expensive nature of the Model S, as well as the risk of voiding the warranty, are the two main obstacles that sit in the path of a Tesla drift car. In fact, Electric GT official circuit machine aside, we can only talk about a partial transformation that beings the EV closer to a racecar status.

We're referring to the P100D drag racer that has lost most of its interior, while gaining a set of custom wheels shod in Mickey Thompson rubber. The sprinting animal seems to have an interesting future and we have a feeling that it won't take long until it strikes again.

 
 
 
 
 

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