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Tesla Model 3 'Project Highland' Gets Rendered One More Time Before Its Official Reveal

American EV automaker and clean energy company Tesla, headquartered in Austin, Texas (formerly Palo Alto, California), is known for many good and bad things.
Tesla Model 3 Project Highland rendering by LaMianDesign 12 photos
Photo: LaMianDesign / X / Twitter
Tesla Model 3 Project Highland rendering by LaMianDesignTesla Model 3 Project Highland rendering by LaMianDesignTesla Model 3 Project Highland rendering by LaMianDesignTesla Model 3 Project Highland rendering by LaMianDesignTesla Model 3 Project Highland rendering by LaMianDesignTesla Model 3 Project Highland rendering by LaMianDesignTesla Model 3 Project Highland rendering by LaMianDesignTesla Model 3 Project Highland rendering by LaMianDesignTesla Model 3 Project Highland rendering by LaMianDesignTesla Model 3 Project Highland rendering by LaMianDesignTesla Model 3 Project Highland rendering by LaMianDesign
For example, they are credited with kicking the EV revolution in the nuts and giving it a major forward jolt if we want to speak in prosaic terms. Otherwise, it's also known as the current ruler of the EV world, having quickly surpassed other promoters like Nissan, who didn't move fast enough to catch the zero emissions wave of sympathy.

But the company – headed by Elon Musk, the one and only, who is now very focused on his latest plaything (X – formerly known as Twitter), also has a terrible reputation regarding delays surrounding new product introductions. Heck, even mid-cycle refreshments are rarer than hen's teeth, so it's always a party when Tesla does operate a facelift on one of its models.

Naturally, its most affordable series – Tesla Model 3 and Model Y – are also the best sellers. While the latter has been around since 2020, its four-door sedan sibling was about three years faster to the market. That's a lot of time since the summer of 2017, when first limited deliveries began, right? During that time, some legacy carmakers have already changed generations! Not Tesla, though. So, it's always a big thing when the automaker starts preparations for a facelift.

As far as the Tesla Model 3 is concerned, that's universally known as 'Project Highland.' Rumors and leaks abound as far as this refresh is concerned, and the latest whisper comes from Giga Shanghai in China, where Tesla has decided to restart a previously closed battery production line because the company expects "explosive" demand for its Model 3 Highland when production and deliveries start ramping up.

Naturally, that also attracted a lot of attention from other, parallel universes. For example, the imaginative realm of digital car content creators was keen on taking part in the Tesla Model 3 Highland festivities, and some automotive artists even set up shop (on X, where else) especially for this kind of digital project. And there's no need to take our word for granted, as we have an eloquent example.

Just recently, we have come across these high-quality CGIs courtesy of an X (formerly Twitter) tip from Sawyer Merritt, who attracted our attention to the deft work by LaMianDesign. The pixel master only has the unofficial Tesla Model 3 Highland project in his or her portfolio, and by the looks of it, we are dealing with someone from China. Never mind the author's location, the work is pretty nifty – done in Alias and UE5, especially for "a 3D modeling practice."

Now, hopefully, these are the final unofficial Tesla Model 3 Highland renderings before the American company finally pulls the wraps off its mid-cycle refresh for the four-door EV sedan. Everyone is growing tired of Tesla's usual tardiness, don't you think? Wink, wink, it seems that new, snowy commercial filming indicates the Cybertruck could hit 'shelves' this winter. Wouldn't it be neat for the Model 3 Highland to drop before that?

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About the author: Aurel Niculescu
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Aurel has aimed high all his life (literally, at 16 he was flying gliders all by himself) so in 2006 he switched careers and got hired as a writer at his favorite magazine. Since then, his work has been published both by print and online outlets, most recently right here, on autoevolution.
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