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Tesla Model 3 and Model Y Control Arm Issue Gets Fixed by German Spare Parts Manufacturer

Tesla vehicles are known for their chronic suspension issues. Keith Leech, also known as Keef Wivaneff, coined the expression Whompy Wheels to talk about the multiple Teslas he found in junkyards and auction lots with apparent suspension issues. Knuckles, arms, ball joints… you name it. The company has had problems with all of them, some pretty scary, such as an arm breaking at 200 kph (124 mph) on an autobahn. There is finally a solution for at least one of them, but it does not come from Tesla. Meyle HD offers it.
Meyle HD fixed the control arm squeaking issue the Model 3 and Model Y present with new component 8 photos
Photo: Meyle HD
Meyle HD fixed the control arm squeaking issue the Model 3 and Model Y present with new componentMeyle HD fixed the control arm squeaking issue the Model 3 and Model Y present with new componentMeyle HD fixed the control arm squeaking issue the Model 3 and Model Y present with new componentMeyle HD fixed the control arm squeaking issue the Model 3 and Model Y present with new componentMeyle HD fixed the control arm squeaking issue the Model 3 and Model Y present with new componentMeyle HD fixed the control arm squeaking issue the Model 3 and Model Y present with new componentMeyle HD fixed the control arm squeaking issue the Model 3 and Model Y present with new component
The German spare parts manufacturer investigated an irritating squeaking noise that all Model 3 and Model Y units produce and discovered it comes from the control arm. Made of a combination of stamped steel and plastic, this part sits under the windshield water drain. Unlike the Model S AC drain hose dropping water on the battery pack, this should not be a problem with more reliable suspension parts. Meyle HD found out that “the Tesla control arm had been designed with insufficient moisture protection.”

According to the German company, the ball joint “is completely over-molded with plastic.” Due to how the suspension works, the plastic eventually separates from the steel. When the rainwater goes from the windshield into the control arms, it “penetrates the ball joint, which ultimately leads to the unwelcome, irritating squeaking sound and, in rare cases, can compromise steering precision.”

Meyle HD solved that with a complete reengineering of the component. Instead of steel and plastic, the company made its part with “high-strength, forged aluminum” that “improves rigidity and reduces weight compared to the original.” The ball joint housing does not require a plastic cover and “forgoes the use of crimping.” According to Meyle HD, that eliminates water invasion and squeaking. The company also increased the diameter of the ball joint and improved the bushings to offer a four-year warranty on the components.

The German spare parts maker estimated that 700,000 vehicles currently face the issue. If the control arms are the same for all Model 3 and Model Y units, all these cars present the problem. If Tesla changed the control arm design in newer models, it should have warned previous owners about the defective control arms. Not that the EV maker was willing to do so, but Meyle HD made that unnecessary. Remember to thank the German company when you buy their new control arms in 2023 or decide to confront Tesla for failing to fix this.

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About the author: Gustavo Henrique Ruffo
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Motoring writer since 1998, Gustavo wants to write relevant stories about cars and their shift to a sustainable future.
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