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Suzuki SV650 and DL650 V-Strom Engines Are Euro4-Compliant

Suzuki has updated the engine of their new middleweight v-twin machines SV650 and DL650 V-Strom, and the lump is now compliant with the Euro4 emission restrictions.
Suzuki SV650 26 photos
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In Europe, the new motorcycles will have to play by the same rule as of next year, and this is why we might see some models disappearing, such as the 125cc two-stroke Husqvarna and KTM machines, or thoroughly updated, possibly with all-new engines, in some cases.

Suzuki preferred the latest approach, and it has updated the v-twin mill, making sure it meets the stricter emission regulations, while remaining thrilling and appealing. No less than 60 new parts have been used in the new power plants, leaving the 645cc displacement untouched.

The 4-stroke liquid-cooled mill produces 75 hp at 8,500 rpm, and a peak torque of 64 Nm (47 lb-ft) at 8,100 revs per minute, which sounds pretty neat for a bike tipping the scales at 197 kg (435 lb) in working order (the SV650).

We shot these bikes at EICMA last year (photos below) and observed that Suzuki was not exactly in a hurry to equip them with too many electronic features. The sales in 2017 will testify whether Suzuki was right betting on the classic approach, not adding ride by wire, multiple engine mappings, traction control and semi-active suspensions to the bike.Suzuki plays the affordability and dependability card
On the one hand, some might say that the new SV650 is not keeping up with the latest developments in the industry, but we expect this model to have two other strong selling points. One should be the reliability of these bikes, which is among the features that made them so powerful.

On the other hand, the lack of fancy electronics (we no longer think ABS is fancy) means that these Suzuki machines will arrive at a very competitive price, and you all know how careful most people are when it comes to spending their hard-earned money.

By offering an affordable all-rounder with a glorious history and a strong following, Suzuki might even up the balance and return to the market with fresh forces. No prices have been revealed so far, but we expect them to make the new middleweight machines look interesting for a lot of people.

And if Suzuki maintains its uber-cool discount offers that allow riders to add both aesthetic and tech upgrades to their bikes as customer cash bonus, we might see a lot of SVs on the streets pretty soon.

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