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Survivor 1969 Road Runner Costs Base 2024 Mustang Money, You Can Drive It Home Right Away

1969 Plymouth Road Runner survivor 9 photos
Photo: craigslist.org
1969 Plymouth Road Runner survivor1969 Plymouth Road Runner survivor1969 Plymouth Road Runner survivor1969 Plymouth Road Runner survivor1969 Plymouth Road Runner survivor1969 Plymouth Road Runner survivor1969 Plymouth Road Runner survivor1969 Plymouth Road Runner survivor
In 1968, Plymouth added yet another spin-off of the trusty Belvedere to the lineup (after the Satellite and the GTX): the Road Runner. A no-show, all-go machine for the average Joe who had a lead foot and a light wallet, the new Plymouth was equally assorted, with an affordable price and a hefty punch. The first generation was by far the main star of the nameplate, and 1969 was the best year for the humble-looking muscle car.
Chrysler estimated that around 20,000 Plymouth Road Runners would sell in 1968, but the demand stretched the production efforts to around 45,000 units. The mid-year addition of a hardtop body style to accompany the to-door coupe convinced the division to keep it in production for 1969, together with a ragtop. The modest Plymouth soared to 81,000+ examples, while it also grabbed the ‘Car of the Year’ honors from Motor Trend.

It might not have looked like much, but it did pack a heavy blow. Initially offered with a bespoke 383 V8 as regular equipment, available solely in the Road Runner, and seconded by the 426 Hemi, the ’69 model introduced yet another coveted star of Detroit’s muscle age. The 440-cubic-inch V8 (7.2 liters) with a trio of dual-barrel carburetors could be ordered from early 1969 onward. Still, it didn’t tilt the sales numbers decisively.

Only 1,412 examples were ordered with the biggest Chrysler engine available, while 787 came with the 426 big-inch Hemi, the 7.0-liter behemoth that offered 35 extra hp over the Six-Barrel’s 390 hp (395 PS) and the same 490 lb-ft (664 Nm). The 383 big-block (6.3-liter) was the workhorse, and the four-speed manual that accompanied it for no extra cost made it even more attractive.

1969 Plymouth Road Runner survivor
Photo: craigslist.org
It wasn’t in the same weight class as the 400+ cubic-inch duo, but it more than delivered. 335 hp and 425 lb-ft (340 PS, 57 Nm) was the new adrenaline for the masses toy, and it sold like hotcakes. Just under 39,500 Road Runners came in this basic setup of a 383 V8 plus a four-speed, but there aren’t too many left today. Not in original, unrestored, untouched, as-made condition.

There’s one in River Falls, Minnesota that might get someone’s attention, mostly because it’s a numbers-matching survivor but also because it’s for sale. Compared to other muscle cars of its era, the asking price isn’t a ‘kids' tuition or this car’ type of choice.

It’s a $32,900 classic gem that doesn’t offer much else except its status. It didn’t have much to offer when new, let’s be honest about that, except for a few details, like an air grabber scoop hood, a vinyl top, and a few other things. The two I pointed out are on this car, and they put a bit of sparkle on an otherwise Cinderella coupe.

1969 Plymouth Road Runner survivor
Photo: craigslist.org
The seller doesn’t mention one critical aspect – the mileage, and the photos don’t show it either. There’s not much information conveyed through the visuals - see for yourself in the gallery. Still, the current owner notes a bit of rust on the lower quarters but underlines the car’s turnkey condition.

It certainly doesn’t look at the top of its game but is an unrestored running and driving automobile. Still, unless you can get the seller to provide more (relevant) photos, a personal inspection would be advisable. Best case scenario: you can drive it home straight away.
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About the author: Razvan Calin
Razvan Calin profile photo

After nearly two decades in news television, Răzvan turned to a different medium. He’s been a field journalist, a TV producer, and a seafarer but found that he feels right at home among petrolheads.
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