autoevolution

Spectacular 1971 Dodge Charger Super Bee With 426 Hemi and 4-Speed Manual Seeks New Owner

The Dodge Charger nameplate is a bit of a mixed bag, as the carmaker deemed fit to use it on everything from compact hatchbacks to muscle cars and even full-size sedans. Today, for example, the Charger is a large four-door sedan, although still emphasizing the brand’s special relationship with horsepower.
1971 Dodge Charger Super Bee 32 photos
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Back in the late 60s and early 70s, however, the Charger stood as a genuine two-door muscle car. The spiritual predecessor to the modern-day Challenger. Some still believe that while the styling of the first-generation Challenger was indeed used when designing the third-gen car, the latter clearly takes after the second and third-generation Chargers in terms of road presence.

Now, regardless of where you stand on the “who should be named what” issue, if you’re a fan of classic muscle cars in general, then feast your eyes on this 1971 Charger Super Bee, currently getting auctioned off through Bring a Trailer. The vehicle was sold new to Grand-Spaulding Auto Sales in Chicago and acquired by the current seller in 2005.

Afterwards, it was refurbished so that its Bring Red exterior would again stand out in a crowd. Other highlights include the white vinyl roof, black Super Bee accent stripes, front and rear spoilers, hood pins, racing mirrors, body-color 15-inch wheels, Goodyear rubber and a Ramcharger hood scoop. It also boasts heavy-duty brakes and Rallye suspension with heavy-duty shocks straight from the factory, to go with the rear leaf springs, front torsion bars and a front sway bar.

Inside, it’s got black vinyl bench seats, woodgrain accents on the dashboard, instrument cluster and door panels, a push-button AM radio, three-spoke steering wheel and a Hurst pistol-grip shifter for the four-speed manual gearbox.

As for what lies underneath the hood, it’s a replacement 426ci V8 unit, with dual four-barrel carburetors.

This car cost $4,882 when new, and if we adjust for inflation, that comes to $34,801 today. Of course, you have to go over sticker when trying to buy such a car in 2021, which explains why the current bid is $57,500 with 10 days left to go in the auctioning process.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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