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SpaceX Is Asking Americans for Help, Starlink Internet Is in FCC's Hands

SpaceX sent out an electronic letter to its users regarding Starlink. The company says lobbyists hired by competitors are playing unfairly. Elon Musk’s aerospace entity claims Dish and RS Access are trying to render Starlink almost useless. Now customers are asked to step in.
Starlink Dish 6 photos
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SpaceX argues in the message sent to its U.S. customers that Dish has sent numerous exaggerated reports through “paid lobbyists” with the only goal to keep its spectrum hegemony intact. The satellite TV company has previously been convicted of buying unneeded AWS-3 spectrum and was ordered to pay over $515 million for not investing in any new services or technology that would help Americans.

In the electronic letter, SpaceX underlines that the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) might be inclined to agree with the faulty analyses sent out by Dish that found a partner in RS Access. The multiple documents sent to the Commission claim a high-power mobile service (e.g. Starlink) can cause much harm to the satellite broadband services.

Starlink’s competitors haven’t brought anything important to the table in the last ten years. Meanwhile, SpaceX already has almost 500,000 customers and reportedly builds nearly 5,000 satellites every week with the sole aim to offer internet to virtually any country on Earth.

If the FCC accepts the conclusions submitted by Dish and RS Access, then Starlink might not be allowed to use the 12 GHz band as much as it would be needed to let any customer connect at any time and enjoy high-speed, low-latency internet.

In reality, if Dish gets their way, Starlink customers will experience harmful interference more than 77% of the time and total outage of service 74% of the time,” can be read in the message sent out by SpaceX.

If you’re looking forward to siding with Elon Musk’s aerospace company, then you should sign this message that asks the FCC, Senators, and Representatives to reject potential unwelcomed rule changes for the 12 GHz spectrum.

Starlink costs $110 per month, but customers must also pay $599 for the hardware. Fortunately, the expensive part is a one-time remittance.

 
 
 
 
 

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