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Some Lucky Rich Bastard Will Call This Grounded Boeing 747 Home Sweet Home

There's a TV show called "Weird Homes" and now there's a very straightforward way of getting featured on it: buying this Boeing 747-400 air-frame and turning it into a living space.
Boeing 747-400 air-frame for sale 13 photos
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The Jumbo Jet is currently on sale on e-Bay, and the bid starts at $299,000. It has a "buy-it-now" price of $900,000, but considering it's only got four days remaining until the bid comes to a conclusion and there have been no offers made so far, we're pretty sure it could sell for a lot less than that. Think about it: $300,000 isn't even that much for a house this size.

Apart from its uniqueness and wow factor, there's also the reliability factor that's worth considering. "Due to the highest standards of construction of these air-frames along with their lifelong servicing and maintenance, it is hard to find a section of the plane that shows any kind of wear and tear," the description states. "The fuselage itself is insulated better than any regular construction project and is much easier and lighter than steel or wood due to the lightweight aluminum."

As for living space, we don't know about you, but this duplex seems to offer more than enough square-footage even for the largest of families. In fact, the seller says that other retired 747 air-frames have even been converted into apartments, so there's clearly no shortage of space. With a total length of 232 feet and a width of 21 feet, the only real problem might be the actual shape. It gives a whole new meaning to the idea of a shotgun-shack.

The only drawback we can see is the fact you'll also need quite a sizeable plot of land. Given that the jet engines have been removed, you don't really need a landing strip as well, but assuming you don't have neighbors who don't mind living with a large wing above their yards, you're still looking at a pretty large lot.

After settling the beast down (landing gear can be acquired separately), the first thing you want to do after buying it is get rid of everything inside. You see, nobody likes to be reminded every day of what it's like to fly in economy class. After that, you've got yourself an empty aluminum tube with several floors (don't forget the normally inaccessible cargo bay) and very tiny windows.

The seller says they have the equipment and know-how of transporting the plane to the buyer's specified location, but those costs will be treated separately (and will probably be quite high). If the sale fails, the 747 will also be available in sections such as the cockpit (for flight simulators), the fuselage or the wings. But we still think that turning it into a home would be the best choice. Just imagine when somebody asked for your address: you'd only have to give them the street and say "don't worry, when you see it, you'll know."

 
 
 
 
 

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