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Slammed Subaru BRZ Has One Inch of Ground Clearance, Owner Wants It Lowered

Modifying your car can be an adventure, and some choices may not be for everyone. While we have covered this topic thoroughly, the world of tuning is an endless universe. In theory, there is room for everyone, but real-life shows that not every modification is appreciated by everybody, but that is normal.
Slammed Subaru BRZ in Hawaii blends Shakotan and Onikyan tuning styles with Bosozoku exhaust 10 photos
Slammed Subaru BRZ in Hawaii blends Shakotan and Onikyan tuning styles with Bosozoku exhaustSlammed Subaru BRZ in Hawaii blends Shakotan and Onikyan tuning styles with Bosozoku exhaustSlammed Subaru BRZ in Hawaii blends Shakotan and Onikyan tuning styles with Bosozoku exhaustSlammed Subaru BRZ in Hawaii blends Shakotan and Onikyan tuning styles with Bosozoku exhaustSlammed Subaru BRZ in Hawaii blends Shakotan and Onikyan tuning styles with Bosozoku exhaustSlammed Subaru BRZ in Hawaii blends Shakotan and Onikyan tuning styles with Bosozoku exhaustSlammed Subaru BRZ in Hawaii blends Shakotan and Onikyan tuning styles with Bosozoku exhaustSlammed Subaru BRZ in Hawaii blends Shakotan and Onikyan tuning styles with Bosozoku exhaustSlammed Subaru BRZ in Hawaii blends Shakotan and Onikyan tuning styles with Bosozoku exhaust
The owner of a slammed Subaru BRZ can attest to this, as his vehicle is a magnet for the attention of those around. While people may look at it intensely, not all gazes are ones of admiration. Instead, many feel that the owner has gone too far, and that leaving just about an inch (ca. 2.54 cm) of ground clearance is excessive, but not as excessive as the camber on this Japanese sports coupé.

One thing is clear, though, this vehicle does belong in Barcroft Cars' Ridiculous Rides series on their YouTube channel. Its owner, Aquilla, is from Honolulu, and he only drives it on weekends with his friends, or when it is taken to car shows. That makes sense, because he cannot turn the steering wheel more than 180 degrees, which makes U-turns impossible on a normal road.

What is even more impressive is the fact that the low ground clearance is achieved through a fixed ride height suspension. Usually, people install air suspension when they are looking for such a low ride height, but Aquilla has made his view of “bags” very clear, as you can observe on the cap of his BRZ's fuel door.

In just minutes, the owner of the slammed BRZ explains his choices and walks us through the build. He has taken inspiration from three car styles in Japan, Shakotan, Onikyan, and Bosozoku. The latter was brought into the discussion just by the exhaust tips, while the former two are more dominant on this BRZ.

The owner of the vehicle also admits that the ride is "super bumpy," but that does not stop him. As Aquilla noted, he does get "lots of different opinions about his car, but it does not matter because he loves it."

We admire his dedication to the build, along with the honesty about the tire contact patch. With that in mind, we cannot help but wonder how quickly, safely, and predictably can this vehicle stop in an emergency situation. Just imagine it having a paperclip or a business card on the asphalt ahead of it.

 
 
 
 
 

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