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Short Bed, Single Cab, High Country Silverados Do Exist, and They’re Custom-Built in Texas
It’s no secret that GM never bothered to equip any short bed, single cab Silverado chassis with the upscale goodies of the High Country trim. The reasons are pretty obvious. However, Texas-based Hersa Motors decided that such a truck would be an awesome idea, and judging by the reactions on social media, they were right.

Short Bed, Single Cab, High Country Silverados Do Exist, and They’re Custom-Built in Texas

Regular Cab Silverado High Country by Hersa MotorsRegular Cab Silverado High Country by Hersa MotorsRegular Cab Silverado High Country by Hersa MotorsRegular Cab Silverado High Country by Hersa MotorsRegular Cab Silverado High Country by Hersa MotorsRegular Cab Silverado High Country by Hersa MotorsRegular Cab Silverado High Country by Hersa MotorsRegular Cab Silverado High Country by Hersa MotorsRegular Cab Silverado High Country by Hersa MotorsRegular Cab Silverado High Country by Hersa MotorsRegular Cab Silverado High Country by Hersa MotorsRegular Cab Silverado High Country by Hersa MotorsRegular Cab Silverado High Country by Hersa MotorsRegular Cab Silverado High Country by Hersa Motors
While sedans have been driven to the brink of extinction by the rise in popularity of SUVs, pickup trucks have not only managed to comfortably retain their marketability. This is especially true and somewhat unsurprising on North American shores where they’re the go-to vehicle for millions of buyers, but even in places like Europe where models such as the Ford Ranger have found a home with families that typically preferred different types of vehicles.

Back in the U.S., the vast majority of those who buy a pickup truck and choose to add all the upscale features available on the options list, go for a double cab. For this reason, GM only offers high-end trims like the High Country on the extended cab version.

Short bed, regular cab trucks are still around, but you’ll only find them in bare stock form as they only appeal to individuals or companies who only use them as four-wheeled workhorses.

All this being said, you might be wondering who on Earth would want a premium-spec, two-door shorty. Well, it turns out there are a surprising number of pickup truck enthusiasts out there who crave such an oddity and, since Detroit’s Big Three has chosen to ignore them, one shop from Hidalgo, TX was brave enough to turn their seemingly-insane dream into reality.

Ran by Julio Hernandez and his cousin Erick Saenz, the family business specializing in vehicle customization has become famous nationwide for its unique High Country conversions.

The process begins with sourcing fourth-gen trucks. To keep costs down, these are generally used models that were part of U-Haul’s fleet. Some have been in minor accidents, which gives the Hersa team low-mileage Chevys to build around.

Before getting converted, each truck is thoroughly fixed, cleaned, and prepared for any customization ordered by potential customers. After this stage is completed, components from High Country spec Silverados are carefully fitted. The team prides itself on using only OEM Chevrolet parts for their conversions. The only exception is the sound system, which is usually an improved aftermarket variant with a huge subwoofer mounted behind the seats.

With new grilles, bumpers, and a high-end interior, the short box, single cab trucks look like they rolled off the assembly line equipped with Chevy’s premium trim. One notable difference between them and their factory-built double cab siblings is the engine. While the latter is powered by 420-hp, 6.2-liter V8, Hersa ’s exquisite shorties have to make do with their original 355-hp, 5.3-liter engines.

Theoretically, the team would be able to fit the larger powerplant inside the single cab trucks but that would drive up both manufacturing and retail prices.

Speaking of which, if you’re one of those Silverado fans who always dreamed about owning a short High Country, Hersa’s conversions start around $46,000 and can go over $50,000 if you want to add stuff like a custom suspension system, bigger wheels, or a potent audio system.

GM executives decided that offering a High Country Silverado in short bed, single cab form would be a bad idea, and judging by the market’s tendencies, we have to agree with them. However, the Texas-based shop proved that there are potential buyers out there who would love to own such a truck. Yes, they won’t be selling them by the hundreds of thousands, but the few that Hersa Motors built so far have worked wonders for the company’s advertising. They have earned a huge number of new followers on social media and a lot more people visit their shop.



 
 
 
 
 

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