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SCG Reveals Final Design for the Hydrogen Fuel Cell Boot Zero-Emission

When we published cutaways revealed by Scuderia Cameron Glickenhaus on December 7, we knew that the Hydrogen Fuel Cell Boot Zero-Emission would present a radical and straight-to-the-point design. Anyway, we have to confess that the final car managed to surprise us: it is even more extreme than we could predict.
Scuderia Cameron Glickenhaus shows final style for the Hydrogen Fuel Cell Boot Zero-Emission 7 photos
Scuderia Cameron Glickenhaus shows final style for the Hydrogen Fuel Cell Boot Zero-EmissionScuderia Cameron Glickenhaus shows final style for the Hydrogen Fuel Cell Boot Zero-EmissionScuderia Cameron Glickenhaus shows final style for the Hydrogen Fuel Cell Boot Zero-EmissionScuderia Cameron Glickenhaus shows final style for the Hydrogen Fuel Cell Boot Zero-EmissionScuderia Cameron Glickenhaus shows final style for the Hydrogen Fuel Cell Boot Zero-EmissionScuderia Cameron Glickenhaus shows final style for the Hydrogen Fuel Cell Boot Zero-Emission
Just have a look at this machine. With no need to have an engine compartment, it turned the space in front of the cabin into a place to store a spare tire and nothing else. That exposes the front suspension and the spaceframe structure of the vehicle. The headlights are placed right below the windshield, at the base of the A-pillars. We can also see a light bar above the windshield and what looks like fog lights in front of the spare tire cradle.

The cabin has room for the driver and a co-pilot. Behind them are located the fuel cells. Behind the rear axle – which also proudly should its suspension – is the massive cryogenic hydrogen tank we had already seen in the previous cutaway images. In other words, this machine is tailor-made for the 2022 Baja 1000 that will be its first official mission.

The post in which SCG revealed the car jokes that the Hydrogen Fuel Cell Boot Zero-Emission is the ideal vehicle for the Apocalypse because “you can distill Hydrogen from water using solar energy.”

As expected, the arguments about a BEV (battery-electric vehicle) being more energy-efficient than an FCEV (fuel cell electric vehicle) immediately emerged. Still, the answer to that was spot-on: energy efficiency is less important than functionality and utility in a car that intends to win a competition and may have to be quickly refueled. It will only succeed if it is faster, not if it spends less energy.

With such a massive tank with liquid hydrogen kept at less than -252.87°C (-423.17°F), the idea is probably to drive without stopping for the about 1,000 kilometers (621 miles) that the competition demands. We would not be surprised if this extreme machine brought SCG another Baja 1000 win.



 
 
 
 
 

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