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Sanctioned Megayacht Solaris Is Heading to the U.S., or Actively Trolling

Superyacht-watching is quite an entertaining way to pass the time, especially after international sanctions went into effect, targeting Russian oligarchs. On that note, megayacht Solaris is here to deliver.
$610 million megayacht Solaris lists new destination on AIS: Anchorage, Alaska 21 photos
The Solaris megayacht sailing in the Antibes, as it's being prepared for owner Roman Abramovich's arrivalThe Solaris megayacht sailing in the Antibes, as it's being prepared for owner Roman Abramovich's arrivalThe Solaris megayacht sailing in the Antibes, as it's being prepared for owner Roman Abramovich's arrivalThe Solaris megayacht sailing in the Antibes, as it's being prepared for owner Roman Abramovich's arrivalThe Solaris megayacht sailing in the Antibes, as it's being prepared for owner Roman Abramovich's arrivalThe Solaris megayacht sailing in the Antibes, as it's being prepared for owner Roman Abramovich's arrivalThe Solaris megayacht sailing in the Antibes, as it's being prepared for owner Roman Abramovich's arrivalThe Solaris megayacht sailing in the Antibes, as it's being prepared for owner Roman Abramovich's arrivalThe Solaris megayacht sailing in the Antibes, as it's being prepared for owner Roman Abramovich's arrivalThe Solaris megayacht sailing in the Antibes, as it's being prepared for owner Roman Abramovich's arrivalThe Solaris megayacht sailing in the Antibes, as it's being prepared for owner Roman Abramovich's arrivalSolaris superyacht is launched at German shipyardSolaris superyacht is launched at German shipyardSolaris superyacht is launched at German shipyardSolaris superyacht is launched at German shipyardSolaris superyacht is launched at German shipyardSolaris superyacht is launched at German shipyardSolaris superyacht is launched at German shipyardSolaris superyacht is launched at German shipyardSolaris superyacht is launched at German shipyard
Motor Yacht Solaris is among the newest megayachts in the world. It is also among the largest and most expensive and, based on reports only, among the most technologically advanced, with features that allow complete privacy for its billionaire owner and his guests and effectively discourage any kind of attempt on their safety. Think bulletproof windows and radar-controlled missile detection system, wrapped in a $600 million, 460-foot (140-meter) package that oozes luxury.

That billionaire owner is none other than former Chelsea FC owner Roman Abramovich, now persona non grata for his alleged ties with President Putin. Current sanctions target oligarchs who are close to Putin, because it is believed it’s their money Putin is using to finance the war against Ukraine, so the idea is, at least in theory, to cut the funding and shorten the war. In reality, sanctions have sparked a frenzy on oligarchs’ part to hide their most expensive assets.

Abramovich, for instance, took the two largest of his five superyachts to Turkey. Solaris has been docked in Bodrum since late March, and it has barely moved since. However, AIS tracking was enabled again on Solaris last week and it shows it heading to a very unlikely destination. Superyacht vlogger eSysman was the first to report this.

Automatic Identification System, or AIS, is mandatory for ships of 300 gross metric tons and above during international travel, so they can be visible for other vessels and port authorities. AIS tracking offers data like port of start, destination, ETA, moving speed, and more specifics on the vessel. In recent months, Russian-owned ships turned AIS off, so they could travel incognito until they reached a friendly port where sanctions would not apply.

Maritime data for Solaris is now showing it heading to the port of Anchorage, in Alaska, which is U.S. territory. That would be a very ballsy move on Abramovich’s part. The moment Solaris docked here, it would be arrested and impounded.

It could also be a mistake on the part of a newbie crewmember or active trolling from the crew. The same reading shows that Solaris is at anchor, so, for the time being, it’s not really going anywhere, despite what its destination reads. Reports in the local media from earlier this month claimed that Solaris would have to leave port in Turkey “with the start of fall,” but offered no reason for it.

 
 
 
 
 

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