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Salamandra Is Not the Custom Harley-Davidson We're Used To, Still Impressive

If you’ve been following autoevolution’s journey through the wonderful world of custom Harley-Davidson motorcycles, then you might have noticed just how diverse this universe really is. From bikes of the 1930s to the most modern ones, no Harley family has ever escaped the long reach of custom shops, at times with great results.
Harley-Davidson Salamandra 25 photos
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But even in this most diverse world, there are some Harley creations that do not show up in the news all that often (read so rarely, they barely count). Such rarities are the trikes, of which, at the moment, there are three on offer in stock form: the Freewheeler, Tri Glide Ultra, and CVO Tri Glide.

None of them are very appealing for custom shops, but it does happen from time to time for them to get special attention. That’s what happened with the 2018 Tri Glide we have here, modified by a Polish team that calls itself Nine Hills.

Called Salamandra, it’s a design meant to represent the shop’s vision “of a bandit incarnation” of the three-wheeler. It came to be after extensive work that meant dismantling the trike, with the goal of remaking all chrome components in black.

The perceived “boring, original graphic design” was replaced with “tastefully made airbrush painting,” and the upholstery was upgraded, including with red stitching.

For new parts, the Tri Glide received new handlebars, an RSD air filter and a Vance & Hines exhaust system as the sole modifications brought to the stock engine of the bike, LED lights, and Arlen Ness foot gear.

The Harley-Davidson Salamandra was put together a while back, and its current whereabouts are not known. So is the cost of all the modifications made to the vehicle, but given how a stock Tri Glide Ultra kicks off at over $35,000, don’t expect a modified one to be on the cheap side of things.

 
 
 
 
 

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