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Rusty 1947 Harley-Davidson WLA Sells for Big Bucks

In the world of Harley-Davidson bikes, the WLA occupies a special place. The machine was made at the request and as per the specifications of the U.S. Army in the years of the second world war, and was based on the civilian version that was known at the time as the WL.
Unrestored 1947 Harley-Davidson 19 photos
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During the war some 90,000 units were produced and most of them, regardless of the year they were made, were given the generic name 1942 WLA, leading to the creation of the 42WLA moniker that stuck with it. So successful was the bike that is was kept in production well after the war ended, until 1952.

The elements asked by the Army that made the WLA stand out from the crowd included special paint (mostly olive or black), blackout lights, luggage racks, and more.

Not many of these can be seen on the 1947 WLA we have here, so we can’t say for sure it this was a bike used by the Army. However, what we can see is something we don’t come across very often: a genuine WLA, apparently in working order despite the rust that is eating away at the metal.

The bike is currently listed as for sale on the Classic Cars website. It allegedly comes with only minor changes compared to its original self: a new exhaust system, a new battery, and a new ignition switch.

The changes as well as the engine rebuild it went through were needed because the original parts had been removed back when the bike was younger and lost to time. The bike itself, although now in working order, had spent much of its life in a barn after the engine failed way back in 1955.

Aside for the few upgrades needed to make it functional once more, the bike sells completely unrestored. The asking price is $37,000, which is a hell of a lot more than what others are asking for theirs.

 
 
 
 
 

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