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Russian Mechanic Fixes Porsche 911 Turbo Wreck by Cutting It in Half

With crazy performance numbers, timeless design, and precise, engaging handling, the Porsche 911 Turbo S is a very desirable car. However, because it has such a loyal following, depreciation isn't that high, so few people can ever buy one.
Russian Mechanic Fixes Porsche 911 Turbo Wreck by Cutting It in Half 8 photos
Russian Mechanic Fixes Porsche 911 Turbo Wreck by Cutting It in HalfRussian Mechanic Fixes Porsche 911 Turbo Wreck by Cutting It in HalfRussian Mechanic Fixes Porsche 911 Turbo Wreck by Cutting It in HalfRussian Mechanic Fixes Porsche 911 Turbo Wreck by Cutting It in HalfRussian Mechanic Fixes Porsche 911 Turbo Wreck by Cutting It in HalfRussian Mechanic Fixes Porsche 911 Turbo Wreck by Cutting It in HalfRussian Mechanic Fixes Porsche 911 Turbo Wreck by Cutting It in Half
This video proposes an interesting workaround to that problem, but the implications are downright scary. If you know that a really cheap second-hand 911 Turbo you wanted to buy had been in a massive crash, would you still buy it?

The upside is that Porsche buyers are well informed and difficult to fool, so let's just dive in and check out the state of the car. It's one of the sorriest-looking shells we've ever seen, one which you can't even call a car. But that's because, unlike in previous Arthur Tussik videos, the 911 was totally stripped out.

The shell looks like it's got cosmetic damage all over. But while we expected the outer skin of the fenders to be taken off and replaced, the mechanic actually chops the car in half, right through the rear floor and pillars. This is especially scary considering the detached part would have housed one of the most powerful six-cylinder engines.

What next? You guessed it, there's a donor car, so somebody crashed another 911 and did all the damage at the other end. Putting the two halves together is not as easy as it sounds, as there are multiple layers involved.

But wait, there's more. The front frame is also damaged to hell and back. More parts are chopped off and fixed using donor parts. The 911 Turbo S ends up with a blue good, one black fender, a gray unpainted bumper, and a silver back end. If Frankenstein ever made a car, he'd appreciate these methods. But we wonder if the donor car's shell wasn't in better condition than this thing.

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