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Russia Develops Electric Lada e-Largus Despite Crippling Sanctions

On February 24th, a short baldie unleashed the Russian Armed Forces on Ukraine. But as you’re well aware, the warmonger in the Kremlin miscalculated his Blitzkrieg in a spectacular fashion. The untold misery of the Russo-Ukrainian War goes beyond the increasing body count, though.
Lada e-Largus official rendering 28 photos
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Western powers responded to Russia’s aggression with crippling sanctions, and Western companies are slowly and steadily leaving the Russian Federation due to said economic sanctions. The automotive industry was hit particularly hard, more so if you remember that pretty much every automaker in the world is going through an increasingly awful chip shortage.

For example, Russian passenger car production fell by 89 percent last month compared to July 2021. The Federal State Statistics Service reports that 281,000 vehicles were manufactured from January through June 2022, representing a downfall of 61.8 percent compared to the first half of 2021.

The country’s economic indicators are terrifying in their own right, especially when corroborated with Russia’s potential to build new cars. Be that as it may, AvtoVAZ intends to roll out an all-electric car next year.

As the headline implies, the company that owns Lada intends to launch an electric version of the Largus. Dubbed e-Largus, the newcomer’s driving range and powertrain specs will be revealed at a later date. Obviously enough, AvtoVAZ is currently keeping quiet because the e-Largus will be a disappointment (if it will ever transition to series production, that is).

First and foremost, the e-Largus in the main photo is nothing more than a rendering. It also happens to be a light commercial vehicle rather than a passenger vehicle, although a passenger-oriented variant is certainly feasible. What’s not feasible is the car’s platform, an old platform developed for the Dacia low-cost car brand that Renault acquired back in 1999.

Introduced by the first-generation Logan four-door sedan in 2004, the B0 was never intended for 100-percent electrified powertrains. Converting an ICE-only platform to EV often results in poor driving range, and obviously enough, straight-line performance leaves much to be desired as well.

As if that wasn’t bad enough, the attached press release paints an even bleaker picture for mass EV adoption in the aggressor state. “Right now, there are approximately 10 charging stations in the republic,” said Alexander Brechalov, head of the Udmurt Republic. A federal subject of Russia, this republic’s capital city is home to Lada’s Izhevsk assembly plant.

On that note, rumors suggest five- and seven-seat passenger configurations, along with a driving range of around 400 kilometers (250 miles).

Editor's note: ICE-powered Largus pictured in the gallery.

press release
 
 
 
 
 

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